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FossilHunter06
Last year, I found these fossils(?) and thought that they were interesting so I decided to keep them in my house until I could find someone to identify them. Luckily, I found this forum so I will appreciate any help or information about these fossils. One of the pictures show what I think is a tooth but I might be wrong. The other pictures are focused around these 'pencil-lead' creatures and I would like to find out what these things really are. I have inserted pictures below with a scale card with multiple angles on each rock. My garden is in Chepstow, Wales.IMG_1194.jpg  IMG_1195.jpg  IMG_1196.jpg  IMG_1197.jpg  IMG_1198.jpg  IMG_1200.jpg  IMG_1201.jpg  IMG_1202.jpg  IMG_1203.jpg  IMG_1204.jpg  IMG_1205.jpg  IMG_1206.jpg  IMG_1207.jpg  IMG_1208.jpg  IMG_1209.jpg
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Barrow Museum
It's a little difficult to tell from the photos alone, but I think the principal circular object, about 5mm diameter, is the cast of a crinoid (sea lily) ossicle.  You will find illustrations of these online.  In life, these calcite discs were stacked on each other to form what appears to be a stem (though they are actually animals, related to the sea-urchins and starfish).  They are often found joined together in a column when fossilised.  You may well have some already from your area.  When the calcite discs dissolve, the hollow cast used to be called a "Screwstone" in folklore.  The individual ossicles, each with a hole in the middle, also attracted a folklore name: "St Cuthbert's beads".  Have a search online for illustrations of each.  These will be Palaeozoic in age, in line with the local rocks in your area.
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FossilHunter06
Interesting. I have looked online for the crinoid 'screwstones' and I do remember that some rocks from my garden have holes which look like the crinoid screwstones. I have also searched up crinoid 'St Cuthbert's beads and I have quite a few myself but not from my garden but instead from Sedbury Cliffs. I also have a column of crinoid from Charmouth, Dorset. The crinoids that I have found at Sedbury Cliffs and Charmouth have starfish shapes which is iconic for crinoids. I could post a picture of a rock that I found from my garden which has a small section of a crinoid and it looks like the 'pencil-lead' creatures so perhaps the creatures are actually crinoids. I could also post pictures of the 'screwstones' once I find the rocks which have them. This information will certainly help me to picture life in my area when it was part of the sea and covered in water. I do also have some rocks from my garden with shell impressions. Thank you very much for this information!
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Gerald Gibson
Fossil Hunter 06:

I agree with the previous members; this is a portion of a crinoid.  Please compare it with the attached portion from my collection of Mid-Cambrian New Mexico fossils.

---- Gerald Click image for larger version - Name: Portion of My Mid-Cambrian Crinoid Collection.png, Views: 16, Size: 433.45 KB
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FossilHunter06
Barrow,

Which picture are you talking about in your previous reply as there are circular objects in most of the pictures. This will help greatly as I am struggling to figure out which one you are talking about. Thank you for the information in your previous reply as it helped greatly to inform me further after reading about crinoids in pocket fossil books that I own (but of course you would never learn about folklore names in pure information books). Thank you for all your replies so far.
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Barrow Museum
Photos 1,2,6,7,8,9.  The small circular casts with the ferruginous colour I take to be crinoid ossicles.  The others photos tend to be too indistinct.  I'd need to handle the rock to be sure of what I was seeing. 
In Photo 5, I have just spotted the impression of what I take to be a flat brachiopod shell too, looks like a member of the Order "Strophomenida", which encompasses a huge variety of brachiopods and a long stratigraphical range.  But, again, this one has a Palaeozoic look about it.
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FossilHunter06
I also have lots of other shells on other rocks which I have found so I will post pictures of those soon, perhaps on the weekend. Thank you again for the information from all your replies!
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Gerald Gibson
Fossil Hunter:

The following attachment should clarify matters.  The picture shown is a typical Crinoid.

---- Gerald Click image for larger version - Name: Parts of Crinoid.png, Views: 13, Size: 186.74 KB
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FossilHunter06
Thank you for the picture showing a diagram of the different parts of a crinoid and showing where the two pictures of your Cambrian New Mexico crinoid parts were placed in life to join up with the other parts of the crinoid. This picture is useful to me especially the diagram as I am sure I will come across them again throughout my fossil hunting hobby and eventually throughout my palaeontological career. This certainly does clarify matters. Thank you for sharing this photo and the information you have given. Thank you!
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