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heath

thanks for all your ideas. Interesting to see your plio tooth Nick. very similar to my specimen. There have ONLY been Kimm Clay finds at my site (so cret Sponge /flint ideas probably not relavant).

I have had it ided from the actual specimen as Fish????????  or Plio/marine reptile. I shall take it to the NHM and see what they say. Keep you posted               Good hunting          Heath

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heath

I found this hooked shape tooth in the lower Kimm clay. By its root its a marine reptile. The enamel is very thin (no coarse ribbing) and in general its almost undamaged with the tip in tact. Has anyone seen similar teeth and rsz_ratchet_marine_reptile_tooth_004.jpg  can id it for me?

Site LOWER KIMM CLAY     SIZE ht 20mm, diameter 10mm

rsz_ratchet_marine_reptile_tooth_006.jpg 

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ThomasM
I've seen similar fish teeth but that's the only thing I've seen similar, it doesn't look like any reptile tooth I have come across.

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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ryanc
Horn or claw maybe? I'm not sure about it being a tooth but its nice whatever it is - looks quite menacing :)
 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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spider
Heath, Its pretty big at 20mm, excellent find,  but no idea for ID sorry.
Have a nice day :0)
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Johnny
Not sure of ID but it is an interesting find!


Mud glorious mud.
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Phileas fossilis
Not sure but looks like an usual flint sponge cast. Nice though

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Naze Dave
Hmm looks like a tooth to me, dont know what its from though, sorry.
thanks
Dave
Still Life
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heath

Thx guys

I think its a tooth, marine reptile? Large excavated root hole underneath. Large creature. The back of Pliosaurs jaws have ratchet shaped teeth to prevent prey from slipping back out the mouth. Could be applicable??? BUT there are no coarse ribs, absolutely smooth, thin enamel. Do land reptiles have thinner enamel? It would be very rare to find land reptiles (dinos!!) at this sight. I live in the hopes its something unusual!!

Thanks for your ideas/comments. I'll post if I do discover what it is

Heath

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prep01
Interesting! I'm no tooth expert, so I would suggest pics to the NHM or another museum as it seems there is not a lot of ideas coming from the forum.

Colin Huller
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Phileas fossilis
Looks 'cherty' like some of the greensand chert if not flint. The base shows some concoidal fracture around the edges which is what you see . Impossible to say for certain from here unfortunately. It sounds boring but it's still a good specimen even if it is not a tooth.

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Nick


Hi Heath,
 
Definitely looks like a tooth - from the root section at least. Size and shape would indicate marine reptile - possibly croc but more likely plio due to being recurved and rather wide. I suspect it had been rolled before being deposited with the sculpture (ribbing/striations etc) having been worn away. Teeth preserved like this are relatively common from the Sponge Gravels (reworked kimmeridge clay deposit).
 
Cheers,
Nick
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Phileas fossilis

I think this is a flint sponge. The teeth from the sponge gravels all seem to have remnants vertical ribbing or fractures.

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Nick


Phileas,
Reptile teeth from the sponge gravels do not all have remnants of vertical striations or fractures. Some do and some don't. In the sponge gravel deposit a variety of taphonomic processes has inevitably led to a variety of preservation in teeth. This is not to say that the nature of the deposit is the same as the one from where Heath found his tooth, but that the absence of tooth sculpture could be explained by pre/post deposition processes. See below for an example of a plio tooth from Sponge Gravels.
 
Cheers, Nick
 
plio1.JPG 
 
 
plio2.JPG 
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Phileas fossilis
Seems to lack the layering seen in this tooth. I would say the clue is in the name of the deposit 'sponge gravels'. Flint sponges frequently form pseudofossils of other things. Although I appreciate it does look like a tooth and there are teeth from there so will keep an open mind in respect of that. I think a good expert from the NHM should be able to confirm either way.
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