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Georgew11
My son found these two fossils amongst many others on the north York coast.we assume one is some sort of fern but was wondering if the other is vertebrae. 948B1FEA-717E-43F2-A4F9-398F0EFEFB1A.jpeg  782088DB-09B3-459D-9E9B-0187EF30AF99.jpeg  581CCCEC-1091-4AF1-A647-8CFA606193E6.jpeg  63F89220-12B9-4714-897E-DE461BC6F2C1.jpeg 
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prep01
Hello George, I am not convinced that the top specimen is bone, , someone else might know. The bottom photo is indeed a fern -(or at least a small part of one) but I am unable to say even if it is Jurassic or if it has been transported where yoy found it by a glacier. Please add a scale to all photos (a ruler is best).
Colin Huller
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Barrow Museum
The bone is the vertebra of a Plesiosaurid marine reptile.  The neural canal and the battered lateral processes are still visible, but the neural spine has been eroded off.  It is compatible with a Lower Jurassic origin (ie, in situ in North Yorks).

The plant is likely a Cycad, and it looks to me (not a palaeobotanist) to be of the genus Nilsonia, on account of the relatively short pinnules. Cycads are still growing in warmer parts of the world today. There's a chance it could be from a Bennititalean, the leaves of which superficially resemble Cycads.  These became extinct in the Cretaceous.   A close look at the cuticle character and venation pattern is necessary to distinguish them - not possible in your photo.  Maybe an expert on this forum can provide a better classification.  The sandstone in which the leaf sits is from the Ravenscar Group, which represents sediments from the earlier part of the Middle Jurassic in Yorkshire (it is not present south of Market Weighton).

Both are really good discoveries.
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Georgew11
Thanks for taking the time to have a look at these,made my son's day reading your post.
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