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efossil

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Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #1 
https://flic.kr/p/X1szAu

Can anyone help details of these fossils I found, being used as hardcore at Orgreave in Sheffield. Are they a byproduct of an industrial process? 
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Dirty Pete

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Reply with quote  #2 
Really nice coal measure plant fossils, obviously coal mining waste being reused as hardcore.
Looks like bits of Alethopteris, Neuropteris, Lepidodendron...and more..

If you can get hold of a copy of Plant fossils of the British Coal Measures you'd be able to ID them accurately.

Cheers

Pete. 
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efossil

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks.
What part of the coal mining process produces such waste?
Cheers
Eric
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Dirty Pete

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Reply with quote  #4 
The coal seams are generally only a few feet thick so in order to give mining equipment and miners room to manoeuvre fossiliferous rock from above and below the seam would be removed. Not to mention rock from the actual sinking of the shaft. This waste would then be dumped on coal tips which is where your lovely fossils came from.

Ironic that you found these in Orgreave, a significant site in the demise of the British coal industry. 

Pete.
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efossil

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Reply with quote  #5 
Ironic indeed. I believe that this spoil has been subjected to heat and therefore more stable and resilient. There are thousands amongst the spoil here, being used to lay pavements for a new housing development. So far I have found around 400 specimens. Check my Instagram for more.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BrA8d_gBJ_0/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=1k7wtzc4p7yc

Merry Christmas.
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Dirty Pete

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Reply with quote  #6 
There's a lot of iron oxide present in the coal measures which often gives the sands and clays a strong red colour. As you suggest this stuff has probably been graded and maybe heat treated.
Still some of the nicest plant fossils I've seen on here for a while.

Pete. 
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efossil

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Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #7 
Cheers Pete
I love the fine detail preserved due to the heat process
Eric.

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Terry

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Reply with quote  #8 
Some great pieces in here!
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s.c.

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Reply with quote  #9 
They’re lovely! What a shame they’re being destroyed. Wonder if I can get extended family to go get me some... (sadly no chance 🙁)
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