GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
Stuwii
You where right about it being a Septarian nodule. I had a friend cut it in two and it has a bright yellow vivid vein in the middle running through it shaped like the legs of Isle of man flag. Just in process of getting it polished up. Will post pics once it's complete. Thanks for information.
Quote 0 0
Stuwii
Hi.
Always had an interest in fossils since I was a kid and I found a tree fossil in a quarry.
Anyway I have moved to East Lancashire now and spend weekends wandering the river paths with my kids who keep fishing fossils and pottery out of the water and asking me what they are. Was wondering if anyone can help me out so I can enlighten them. I know some are crinoids but the rest are a mystery to me. Thanks in advance.


201628151649_20160208_130425.jpg 
201628151849_20160208_130240.jpg 
201628152150_20160208_130210.jpg 
Quote 0 0
MicroFossilMan

Welcome Stuwii!

Could you give more details on where you found your specimens - it helps people to narrow down the range of possibilities.

I think the ball-like thing in your hand is a septarian nodule. This not a fossil, but is formed in sedimentary rocks when minerals precipitate out from circulating fluids. They can look quite nice if sliced in two and polished.

You do seem to have crinoids, but I'm not sure of the rest - could you take close-ups and post them here? From different angles too if the thing is not completely symmetrical ...

MFM
Quote 0 0
CurtKnap
The ribbed specimen on the right looks like a plant stem (Calamites sp?) - this and the crinoid sections are presumably Carboniferous from East Lancs.
Quote 0 0
Stuwii
Hi thanks for the information. They came off a shale/sand bank along the ribble near to West Bradford. The banks collapse at intervals with the rain exposing mesolithic flint implements also. Have found a few horse teeth and horse leg bones but age wise I would date them around last few hundred years or so. I did think the ball thing was a crinoid bulb that's been bashed about by the waters action. Yes I will take some more close ups of them and post them. Thanks for help. Really interesting.
Quote 0 0
MicroFossilMan
The rocks in that area are Carbonifeous in age, about 340 million years old. If you're curious about what you're walking over, try the British Geological Survey's online map at -


Set the display to show "bedrock only", as that gets rid of more recent rubbish plastered over the area by rivers or glaciers.

MFM
Quote 0 0
Stuwii
A tad late 🙄 but as promised!

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=1NWm4V1PAciOSPRXvrttwpnHT4kVHOxIE
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us