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Fuzzyduck
I guess some sort of shell fossil? 
Found at West runton beach, Norfolk.
It is the only one I found like it but from a novices point of view it doesn't look like the other Belemnites I was finding.
Any help on ID would be much appreciated.
Many Thanks
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Bill G
Hi fuzzyduck can you re-post pics please. I accidentally deleted your first post
Cheers, Bill
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Fuzzyduck
Here are the pics  Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190905_184311.jpg, Views: 49, Size: 118.46 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190905_184337.jpg, Views: 49, Size: 96.02 KB
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Dirty Pete
I think it's the part of a belemnite called a phragmocone

Pete
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prep01
Hello, I THINK this is a part of a belemnite called the phragmacone, but it is interesting as they died out in the Cretaceous, so it has travelled a fair way! Belemnite.jpg 
Colin Huller
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Fuzzyduck
I found it in West Runton, just on the chalk bed mixed in with seaweed and other small shingle. 
Sorry for my lack of knowledge, but what exactly is this part in comparison to other parts of belemnite fossils ? I have had a look online but not found much or haven't understood it properly
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Dirty Pete
Belemnites had internal shells consisting of three parts, the phragmocone sat in a conical cavity (alveolus) at the end of the guard/rostrum (bullet shaped thing). The phragmocone had chambers and a siphuncle and is equivalent to (homologue of) the shell of an ammonoid/nautiloid. A pro ostracum projected forward from the phragmocone. See Colins diagram.

Hope this helps

Pete

Heres a reconstruction if you're still confused

Reconstruction-of-the-belemnite-animal-based-on-Naef-1922-Stevens-1965.png
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Weald on Bed
Yup - it's a phragmocone. Far less common than the rostrum part of the belembite.
Geology of the Cromer beds is a bit confusing but cretaceous chalk platform (often covered by the sand) is the 'base-layer' along that stretch of coast, with Pleistocene deposits eroding out of the cliffs above and getting washed down - so ice-age fossils often end up side by side in rock pools anywhere along this coast.
BTW, best place to look along W Runton and Overstrand beaches is in the little pools and depressions that form around the base of the groynes and sea defences, esp where they cut into the chalk. 
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Fuzzyduck
Thank you everyone for your help. The diagrams were a great help.
Is West runton any good for Amonites? 
All I have been finding are parts of Belemnites and a couple parts of bone and tooth. 
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Weald on Bed
Hi Fuzzyduck,

Whilst the beaches between Sheringham and Mundesley offer a good range of later Cretaceous fossils from the chalk, I've never heard of ammonites being found on any of them. Probably your best bet for finding ammos in Norfolk is Hunstanton. There's a good description of the location on this site at https://ukfossils.co.uk/2003/06/12/hunstanton/ 
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