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Geotom
Buvalve with a dark tooth shape inside it but not sure if it is?  15707213017992664633114177085940.jpg  15707213887253588266458566687558.jpg 
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prep01
Hi Tom, is this a flint and where is it from? I'm not convinced that it is a fossil inclusion, but might be a section through a bivalve. I can't  see the outer as a bivalve - more photos?
Colin Huller
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Geotom
Hi colin its from osmington mills in dorest and I'm unsure whether it is flint.  15707248856359214136438673327151.jpg  15707249128142910353690805987182.jpg  15707249584578378193891306829203.jpg 
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prep01
Thanks for the extra photos, I now agree it's a bivalve - very water worn and the 'tooth' is infact just a section that has been chipped off, but it is too worn to say any more.
Colin Huller
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Barrow Museum
The last photo just shows the parallel, concentric rows of knobbly ridges, which with the colour and texture of the rock, the general outline of the bivalve and the fact it comes from Osmington Mills tells us it is the Trigoniacia family bivalve "Myophorella clavellata", which occurs in such great abundance in one rock layer it gave its name to the "Trigonia Clavellata Formation", though I'm not sure the name is still in use.

Have a look at some pictures of them at Osmington Mills here: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~imw/Corallian-Fossils.htm
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Geotom
Thank you both. 

I'm still unsure on the 'tooth' shape I may try and remove would you suggest any techniques 
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Barrow Museum
A suggested technique? - Yes, don't even try to remove it.  What you are seeing is a part of the imprint of the smooth interior of the bivalve shell.  It definitely is not a tooth and any attempt at extraction will simply destroy the specimen.  You might strike lucky at Osmington Mills in the Kimmeridge Clay - I have seen vertebrate material picked up from there. If you haven't been to the Etches Collection in nearby Kimmeridge village, then I encourage you to pay a visit.  You will definitely get your eye in for finding marine reptile teeth and bones there.
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