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gigantopithicus
 What gives it away as more likely being mineral growths is the bands within it that you can see on the enlarged images, that would be from the way the pyrite is almost concentrated in layers around an individual point, often something organic like a piece of wood.

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Leigh
i was wondering if any 1 can help me id this 1
[attach:fileid=http://www.discussfossils.com/forum/uploads/public/speeton1.JPG]

 

[attach:fileid=http://www.discussfossils.com/forum/uploads/public/speeton2.JPG]

 

[attach:fileid=http://www.discussfossils.com/forum/uploads/public/speeton3.JPG]
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gigantopithicus
 Looks like a ball of mudstone with pyrite growth through the centre and dessication cracks on the surface

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Leigh
i sent a mail to Karen Chin and this was her reply

Hello Leigh,


Based on other specimens I have seen, your specimen does indeed look like a coprolite.  Nevertheless, I canƒ¢¢â€š¬¢â€ž¢t say for sure whether it is based on the photographs.   Actually, it can sometimes be difficult to determine whether suggestive-looking rocks are coprolites---even if they seem to have the right shape.   Characteristics like color, shape, and size can be red herrings that might not necessarily provide useful clues that can be used to identify fossilized feces.  I usually look for characteristics such as an appropriate chemical composition (especially calcium phosphate), the presence of chopped up organic materials that may be dietary residues, shape, the presence of distinctive burrows, and geological and paleontological context.


But I understand that the Speeton Formation has a subunit called the ƒ¢¢â€š¬…“Coprolite Bedƒ¢¢â€š¬‚ or ƒ¢¢â€š¬…“E Bedƒ¢¢â€š¬‚, so I suspect that numerous coprolites have been found in this Formation!  You might consider contacting geologists at a local college or one of the moderators of the following website to see if they can provide more information about coprolites found in the Speeton Formation.


http://www.speeton.ukfossils.co.uk/geology-guide.html



Best wishes,


Karen Chin


Associate Professor and Curator of Paleontology


Geological Sciences and Museum of Natural History


University of Colorado


UCB 265


Boulder, CO  80309


I have several other fossils i would like an id on will post when ive take photos of them

thx for all info
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prep01
Yes I agree with gigantopithicus!

Colin Huller
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Bill G
Hi Leigh,
 

The link you gave is actually for this website, UKFossils.

I enhanced one of your pic's. To me it appears to be a coprolite, at first glance, but I don't think it is.

 

[attach:fileid=http://www.discussfossils.com/forum/uploads/238/speeton31.jpg]

 

 

 

 
Cheers, Bill
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Leigh
arr pitty but thx for the info will post more soon and reg on this forum
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Anthony Rybak
looks like a crinoid calyx to me
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Naze Dave
It doesnt look like coprolite to me due to lack of organic matter and internal appearance, i dont think it is crinoid due to lack of regular structure. I agree with giganto on this.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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