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TqB
Hi, just checked BPF and realised you were onto the right ID all along...

Names change surprisingly often, and revisers sometimes forget to change the gender when a species is assigned to a new genus. It's wrong in the 2nd edition too but corrected by the 5th.





Edited by TqB 2015-05-28 13:27:09
Tarquin
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MicroFossilMan
Does anybody know what this is? Or even what sort of thing it is? Coral? Polyzoan? Alga?

I'm afraid I don't know for certain where it came from (collected it as a child, and for once I didn't record location details), but it may be from Shropshire, so probably Ordovician or Silurian.

The hexagonal cells look like figure 1, plate 16 in British Palaeozoic Fossils or possibly figure 9 plate 15. But I'm really not at all sure. Note the circular depression. The whole "network" is about 4cm across.


F177-PRI.jpg 


MFM
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dinogary
Hello..it looks very Like the silurian algae- mastapora fava
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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TqB
I think Gary's right (spelt Mastopora ).
Tarquin
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MicroFossilMan
I notice that in BPF (3rd edition) that it's Mastopora favus (plate 15), but now it's M. fava. Do they change things like that very often?

Wouldn't it be great if all the fossils from BPF et al were online as images ...


MFM
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MicroFossilMan
Ah, I see now. I hadn't realised that the (adjectival?) species had to agree in gender with the genus. They say you learn something new every day!

Of course it begs the question of how one knows the gender of the genus ... an 'a' ending is usually feminine and 'us' usually masculine?
MFM
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