GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
TqB
Hi Adam. It seems to have tabulae which Cladochonus doesn't much.
Tarquin
Quote 0 0
adam15
Hi could you have a closer look at my finds. All of them found in West Ireland
21.jpg 
22.jpg 
23.jpg 
Pics 1,2,3 were found on the Galway beach. Corallites diameter is 6 mm.
24.jpg 
25.jpg 
Fossil from pics 4 and 5 was found in limestone quarry near Galway. Diameter is 2 mm.
26.jpg 
27.jpg 
Pics 6 ,7 coming from Gort. Corallite is 6 mm in diameter up to 12 mm the big one in the middle.
28.jpg 
29.jpg 
Last fossil probably calcisponge. I cant even say that carboniferous?

Quote 0 0
TqB
Hi Adam,

Pics 1,2: Siphonodendron sp. (seems to have columella).
Is pic 3 the same specimen? - can't actually make out columellae so it's possibly Diphyphyllum or diphyphylloid Siphonodendron.

Pics 4, 5: Siphonodendron junceum

Pics 6,7: a bit faint but Siphonodendron sp.again.

Last one - could indeed be Chaetetes if Carboniferous. How wide are the tubes.


Tarquin
Quote 0 0
adam15
Hi. Pic 1 is different than pics 2 and 3.
Last fossil tubes are less than 0,5 mm
Quote 0 0
TqB
OK, thanks, I'll stick with what I said then 



Edited by TqB 2015-03-03 16:27:02
Tarquin
Quote 0 0
valh
Hi Adam,very nice specimens!

Hi Tarquin! Here it is necessary to look  longitudinal section. By location tabula can see it is Chaetetes  or Tabulata.
Valerij
Quote 0 0
adam15
Thanks for answers.
Here is one more pic of last fossil from first post.
20150301_121812.jpg 

I have two more corals to id.
First was found in Burren karst limestones
30.jpg 

Second found in the big dark limestone? I could almost pick them without tools from weathered surface of rock. Looks like Caninia but there was no bigger examples than these on pic below.
31.jpg 
Quote 0 0
TqB

"Hi Tarquin! Here it is necessary to look  longitudinal section. By location tabula can see it is Chaetetes  or Tabulata."

Hi Valerij! - true, although 0.5mm suggests Chaetetes, and it is likely to be Carboniferous from there.

New ones: the first is Siphonodendron, S. junceum I think as the structure looks very simple - what's the corallite diameter?

For the solitary ones, I'm afraid ID isn't possible without sections. Nice specimens! 



Tarquin
Quote 0 0
adam15
tubes up to 2 mm.
I will cut and polish one of the solitary corals.

I was almost sure that pics 4 and 5 from the first post is Syringopora because no sign of septa.
It seems that Syringopora species must be much rarer than junceum. 
 I found old book with different names for fossils. Is Lithodendron sexdecimale the same what S. junceum?
Quote 0 0
TqB
Hi, yes, 2mm will be junceum.

I've had a closer look at 4/5 and you're quite right, it's Syringopora - I was fooled by the apparent columella in several of the corallites and put the lack of septa down to fuzzy preservation...

As for relative rarity - depends on the bed but S. junceum is probably the commonest Carb coral.

Yes, sexdecimale Phillips, 1836 is a junior synonym of junceum (as juncea) Fleming, 1828.
Tarquin
Quote 0 0
adam15
Hi again. I've cut and polished one of the small Rugosa corals. It's not really good work because i didn't get proper tools yet.
20150305_143421.jpg 
Quote 0 0
adam15
45.jpg 
Quote 0 0
TqB
Hi, that's a good start! 
 You really need a specialist in this particular group which is massive and difficult. All I can say is that it's a zaphrentoid, such as "Zaphrentis" itself (a very broadly applied genus) or a juvenile caniniid which looks much the same.


Tarquin
Quote 0 0
prep01
Hello Adam - have you read my article on polishing fossils?
See Guides ? 8. Polishing ossils.
Colin Huller
Quote 0 0
adam15
Hi. Many thanks for help. 
I've just read an article. It's very helpful.
Quote 0 0
adam15
Hi. Is it possible that pics 4 and 5 from the top is Cladochonus?

Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us