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Rockbear
Hello all.
New member here and complete amateur.
I found a flint that I would love some help identifying.
If anyone could help I would appreciate it. Click image for larger version - Name: 1554778624230223713160.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 123.04 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190409_153826.jpg, Views: 20, Size: 158.76 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190409_153856.jpg, Views: 20, Size: 157.30 KB
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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. I am a little bothered about this being a flint. The surface of flint doesn't crack like this and the bottom end that is broken doesn't look like flint either! Please can you confirm that you can't scratch the surface with something steel (like a screwdriver) and leave a groove? Is it quite heavy for its size?
This is one of those specimens where it is much easier to help with if it s 'in the hand'. Please could you also include as much detail as possible in future posts as to where you found it, was it in a field, quarry seashore or in matrix (ie a cliff, boulder hard clay etc.
If I had to 'put my neck on the block' - from your photo and info, I would say this was a 'modern' bone.
Colin Huller
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Rockbear
Hello prep01.
Sorry about the lack of information.
I can not scratch into the surface.
It weighs something like a bag of sugar.
I found it in a chalk area on the seashore.
It is absolutely not a bone. It sounds like flint when tapped, feels like flint. It has the wieght of flint.
It appears to have a head with a jaw, a spine and a hooked tail.
The picture is not clear, I will try to get a better one posted now.
Thank you for your response.
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Rockbear
Hello prep01.
I can not scratch into the surface.
It weighs about the same as a bag of sugar.
I found it on the coast in a chalk area.
It is not a bone.
It sounds and feels like flint.
It appears to have a head with a jaw, a spine and a hooked tail. Click image for larger version - Name: 1554820847526825980771.jpg, Views: 27, Size: 146.92 KB
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prep01
Hi, OK thanks for the information. This is then the internal cast of a burrow - very common in the chalk. Please see below more infomation on flnt and flint burrows.

2014+Mortimore+on+Flint.jpg 

Flint Burrow.jpg 
Colin Huller
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Richard
Hi 
A very interesting piece of flint. The green colour is unusual. It may be due to growth of algae  e.g. Protococcus. On the other hand I have seen a similarly coloured mineral in chalk - but never on flints. If it has been in the sea for a long time, could it be green glauconite as found on flints from the Upnor Formation? 
Richard
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Brittle Star
Rockbear
People here are very experienced. They can only go on photo and location. A photo of each side helps as does a scale or ruler in the shot.
If you cannot accept ideas given here. Please take it to a museum who can hold the item and tell you their thoughts.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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Rockbear
Thank you brittle star.
I will do exactly that.
Good luck to you all.
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Rockbear
Will do.
Thank you brittle star.
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