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Elbert

Hello again, as I am at this very moment in the south of France, I have visited one of the sites where Tisoa siphonales is common and I found a specimen that could be a twin of yours...

So I am quite sure it is what you found.

I`ll probably collect this specimen I`ve seen, so I can photograph it when I return home in Holland next week and try and get this on the forum.


greetings, Bert

the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Penny
Can someone please shed any light on this piece I found sticking out of the clay in Lyme Regis?


unknown04.jpg 
unknown00.jpg 

unknown02.jpg 

unknown01.jpg 
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Koss1959
Looks like an old tank shell or something. It's not metal, is it?
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Julian123

Err - might be an idea to be careful, as said above its possible its a shell from the war!
Julian

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Penny
No it is not metal. lol. It is a fossil, it had a type of shell at one point I'll give you that, the surface is like that of crack seashell or something. That is a cross section btw, it came out like that, I have washed the clay off (ish).
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Penny
Oh also, the close ups are so that you can see the groves and cracked parts of the actual fossil itself. I thought it might help.
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Koss1959
I go fossiling on Lyme Regis around three or four times a week and have never seen anything that looks similar to that. The base looks too perfectly circular. I only suggested a tank shell as there have been a number of grenades found on Charmouth and Lyme and I have a friend who is a scallop diver in Lyme Bay. He's found three WW2 bombs. Can you clean it some more? I'd still be extremely careful with it until you know beyond all reasonable doubt that it's not man made.
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Julian123

It really doesn't look like a fossil to me
Julian

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Penny
If you saw it in real life you'd see that it is a fossil. 
I am quite serious this is not man made, it is naturally broken and that round part is a cross section.
You see the little dark patch in the middle of the circle? That's the core of some thing, I just don't know what. 
Maybe this thing is'nt as clear as I wanted it to be in the pictures, but this is NOT man made people. ;> It has broken bits of fossilized shell on the outside that seemed to have grown upwards with small smooth grooves.
If I clean it up any more I'll remove what remains of the skin/shell on the outside. Perhaps this was a plant or sea creature?
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Penny
Oh like this! - http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/38855-orthocone-cephalopod-or-ancient-devonian-tree-tully-ny/page-4
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prep01
How about a part of a core from a borehole with bits of fossil in it?
Colin Huller
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Penny
Hmm, it came down with a whole lot of clay on the lyme Regis cliff beach. I'm not really sure it that's possible? Anyhow, I think I'll take it back to Lyme Regis to the Fossil shop and let the guy there look at it. It'll be better for someone to take a real look I guess.
Just hope we don't have to call the bomb squad! lol ;)
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TqB
I think it's a compaction feature around a concretion  - soft, wet sediment is compacted vertically around an already solidified nodule forming the striae. The interface is then mineralised (calcite or possibly selenite?) giving the shell-like layer.

A lot of concretions have a crust like this (I don't know the chemistry!) - the long axis of this one is apparently vertical so maybe it formed along a burrow of some sort.

Edited by TqB 2014-09-02 20:41:24
Tarquin
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Penny
Well it makes a good paper weight what ever it is! :3
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Elbert

Hello, this looks a bit like Tisoa siphonales, the result of mineral-rich gas that has seeped trough the sediment depositing it`s minerals in the proces.

In the French Domerian it is a common occurence in the margaritatus and apyrenum zone.

The thingy in the middle is the remnant of the original gas channel.

These things occure when the general sealevel is lowering.

greetings, Bert

the search is as valuable as the finds...
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