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StellaF
I think my first attempt at posting this came with no photo. Found near Whitby. I have no clue what it is. Any pointers appreciated. Thank you. Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_1743.jpg, Views: 46, Size: 795.64 KB
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Barrow Museum
It is a part of the large ammonite Phylloceras, (almost certainly Phylloceras heterophyllum) which occurs fairly frequently in the Whitby Mudstone Formation (which is the black shaly rock forming much of the cliff profile along the Whitby coast).  I can tell easily because of the distinctive suture pattern exposed on the fossil.  The suture line is where the convoluted chamber walls of the ammonite intersect the outer shell.  The pattern is distinctive for each ammonite species.

Phylloceras is one of the remarkable ammonites (strictly speaking it's an ammonoid) from which the Jurassic ammonite faunas were derived.  It is related to something that survived the end Triassic extinction and diversified as it evolved.  The genus survived almost unchanged through the rest of the Jurassic and Cretaceous and is commoner in what were warmer climes during the Jurassic, in the Tethys Ocean,  So you might expect to find them more frequently around the Mediterranean and Middle East, for example
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StellaF
Thank you for such a detailed and informative response to my query. I had wondered if that was a possibility but the pattern did not seem symmetrical enough, though of course with only a small piece to go on I couldn't get a feel for the overall effect. I have another interesting find that I shall post and see what people say. I love finding fossils and then finding out what they are. I do have an identification book but it can only go so far in helping me work out what my finds are.
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