GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
Monkey
Hi there,

I found these three fossils on Eastbourne beach in the last week.

They were in the pebbles on the beach.

The last one may not be a fossil - I am still learning :-)

Any help would be appreciated - especially around the age.

Thanks very much!

Brown 1.jpg  Grey 1.jpg  Circle 2.jpg
Quote 0 0
Weald on Bed
First example is part of the cast of a cidarid sea urchin. Those little structures that look like suckers are the tubercles where thick spines would have attached.
2nd pic shows some of the calcite-preserved plates from a different type of sea urchin. Not sure about the 3rd one - can't see enough detail.
Quote 0 0
Barrow Museum
First photo is of a flint pebble, with the impression of a fragment from a Cidarid echinoid (sea urchin). There are some good illustrations of the complete sea urchin (without its spines) here:  http://oursins.flo.over-blog.com/article-oursin-102616161.html  . When alive, it bore a set of heavy spines on each of the circular structures.  Try an internet search for "Tylocidaris" for more illustrations.
The flint originated from layers of nodules in the Chalk, which was deposited some 90 million years ago, give or take a few. There's plenty of chalk and flint at Eastbourne!  I cannot see any distinct fossils in the other two flint pieces.  A closer photo with more detail might change my mind, but I am inclined to say that the enclosed objects are just parts of the chalk that were partly or totally unsilicified, during the formation of the flint, shortly after the chalk was deposited.  Hope that answers your query.
Quote 0 0
Barrow Museum
On closer inspection of the second image, "Weald on Bed" is right...it is a segment of sea urchin too.  I should have enlarged the photo on the screen.  We both need a better photo with higher resolution to tell you more about the third picture.
Quote 0 0
Monkey
Thank you very mcuh Weald and to you too Barrow - that's fantastic! I really appreciate you taking the time to help a learner! I am off to google what they looked like when they were alive. Am aiming to do a dedicated fossil search soon rather than the usual "keep an eye out whilst taking a walk" approach,Thank you!
Quote 0 0
Bill G
Hi monkey your duplicate posts were awaiting approval. 
Cheers, Bill
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us