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FossilHunter06
   IMG_1538.jpg IMG_1547.jpg  IMG_1548.jpg       IMG_1555.jpg IMG_1556.jpg    I have given examples of Ammonite  fossils from West Bay, Burton Bradstock, Dorset, England and I am requesting identification if possible as I seek to create a database of fossils from different locations and at the moment I am working on a database for Burton Bradstock to serve as a benefit to myself. Thank you in advance to anyone who shares their ideas! Thank you very much!

FossilHunter06
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Barrow Museum
These must be from fallen blocks of the Middle Jurassic, Inferior Oolite.

Second photo:  The half-protruding ammonite looks a bit like Leioceras or one of its close relatives, but the centre would need to be exposed to be sure.  The others I'm afraid are not identifiable with the images shown.  The keel, cross section and the way the outer whorls wrap around the inner ones are all important features in identifying these ammonites, and none shows them all.

Fourth photo:  My guess is Parkinsonia, but again, seeing the venter (outer whorl edge) is critical.  If it has a smooth band, then the ID is correct.

I see there are a few more ammonites, but they need exposing better.  Submit some more photos when you have worked on cleaning the matrix from them.
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estwing
Not sure about the Parkinsonia, the ribs seem to be bifurcated nearer the umbilicus, whereas in Parkinsonia they do so very near the ventral area:
  WestBayFossil.png   Parkinsonia.png   
And it seems to have fewer and thicker ribs
Maybe some kind of Garantianinae?
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FossilHunter06
Hello Barrow, 

What equipment would you suggest to use to clear the matrix from my ammonite fossils?

Many Thanks,

FossilHunter06
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prep01
Hi, this rock is very hard and you will need to get it done by someone with an air powered set up.
Colin Huller
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Barrow Museum
Before acquiring all the air-pen/air abrasive units, which as stated would be perfect for the job,  I used to use darts...unscrew and discard the feathers and use the rest as a mini chisel, tapping gently against the rock with a small hammer or piece of metal.  It takes a long time, but if you are careful, it achieves the same end.  Be careful not to allow the point to impact the ammonite directly and practice on something of little value first.  The hardened tip of darts is just about right and the brass shaft just softens the blow a fraction, but of course, they are not much use for anything else once you have started the job.

The chunk of rock in your second photo looks well worth some effort in cleaning, as I can see at least 6 ammonites (or parts thereof).
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FossilHunter06
Would a tiny chisel work as well, Barrow?

FossilHunter06
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prep01
IMHO (decades of prepping) you would not have the control with a chisel, but new Tungsten tipped darts would be a better bet - I wasn't suggesting you go out and buy propper tools, rather get a prepparator to do it for you (obviously you would have to pay for the service) But if you have the time and patience, then why not have a go! There are tools to help you in the UKGE shop which are reasonably priced which will make the job a little easier as well (electric engraver, etc) but from (bitter) experience this can be very hard rock!
Colin Huller
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