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K
I found this fossil in Suffolk (or Southend) quite a few years ago and I’d really love to have it identified. 

Thanks 
k 13DAB8B6-1860-4BAD-8B88-DD4402164AB9.jpeg  EAFF6E88-7FC6-414E-8AF5-8298D96F47FF.jpeg  42A79E57-6AD3-45CB-B04F-63B2C3648368.jpeg 
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MartynH
Hi, from the photo that looks like a belemnite phragmocone which has a conical, chambered shape. To be sure would need to know exactly where the fossil was found to understand the age of the local rocks, also would help to have a ruler or something in the photo so the size of the fossil can be seen. That said I am sure this is one of the 3 parts of a belemnite called the phragmocone which was the chambered part of the animal that it used for maintaining neutral buoyancy by filling the chambers with seawater. 
Martyn H
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K
C7501300-65C6-4E80-9627-E6AE31850A5E.jpeg  209BBC57-63D6-47DB-9318-91FDEDC0DD3C.jpeg  5FB5B4B9-FA4A-4721-AD3E-70119A620722.jpeg  Hi Martyn, thank you for your response. I am a complete novice who found this piece a number of years ago whilst walking along the beach in South End on sea. 

Ive done a little research which suggested the fossil was part of some form of cephalopod but that was simply based around other examples I found on google. I welcome an experts opinion, and appreciated the extra information you added about the biology of the animal.

Most of the examples I found online were more “natural” in colour, could this piece be more golden in colour due to it being set in Pyrite? 

Ive amended the location in which I found the fossil and have added some scaled pictures to try and get a more precise identification. 

Thanks 
K

 
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prep01
Hello K and welcome to the forum. Martyn is quite correct, it is the floatation end of a belemnite which gets larger as tha animal grows. What is intruiging me is its preservation. Can you please let me know if you can scratch the main rock (nodule) with a steel object and either leave a groove or just  silvery line? This is a very nice specimen and slightly unusual preservation - assuming it is a flint nodule. It would have been fossilised some 70 - 80 million years ago.
Colin Huller
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