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Janenschia
Have been going around Whitby for the past few days and gotten these from salt wick bay and Runswick/Kettleness Bay
 
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Barrow Museum
Three objects from the Toarcian Stage, Whitby Mudstone Formation (commonly, Upper Lias):
The first is probably Ovaticeras - quite a rare find, from a limited stratigraphical horizon (Ovaticeras band/nodules) which happens to run across the wave-cut platform at Saltwick.
The second is Dactylioceras tenuicostatum, one of the early species of this genus. (normal to find at Runswick; not at Saltwick)
The third object is more of a mystery.  I am wondering if it could be a fragment of a strangely broken/eroded belemnite phragmocone.  Someone here might have a better idea.
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Janenschia
Apologies for the bad photo but the 3rd I think is a nautiloid fragment, it’s patterning is similar to that of Cymatoceras from the Isle of Wight, the suture is very simple.
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Barrow Museum
I did consider a nautiloid, but discounted it as the "sutures" seemed too clustered together for any nautiloid from the Lower Jurassic that I've seen and the fossil did not break along a septum, which would be normal in such a case.  Any chance of some really sharp photos on a flat surface with a ruler, including of the broken side?  It looks well water-worn.  Is there any chance it came out of the glacial till?
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