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hoodie07
I found this interesting bones in Whitby in around the 3 square metre radius of each other.

Could they both be related?

Would love it if someone can give me some insight.

Also, I want to know how best to preserve the fossils, both cleaning them and preserving them as this is my duty now

Thanks in advance!  Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200722_120846.jpg, Views: 55, Size: 356.34 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200722_120832.jpg, Views: 61, Size: 319.16 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200722_120810.jpg, Views: 55, Size: 383.46 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200722_120658.jpg, Views: 59, Size: 605.59 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200722_120651.jpg, Views: 64, Size: 439.10 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200722_120641.jpg, Views: 59, Size: 559.76 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200722_120631.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 572.94 KB
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Scrumpy
No expert but can’t see any bone unfortunately 
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Dirty Pete
Hi,
The first bone pile has an ammonite growing out of it and the long bone looks like rock, lime mudstone, maybe a burrow infill. I don't think this is bone unfortunately. 

Pete
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hoodie07
Don't mean to be rude, but how can you not see a bone? It's clear as day, but need to understand what I am working with.... Anyone else validate my thinking?
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hoodie07
Sorry definitely a bone, here's before excavation IMG_20200721_131010.jpg 
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Dirty Pete
Suggest you take one of the broken sections, clean off dirt/mud with water then take a close up pic of the cleaned up broken ends.

Pete
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Weald on Bed
The overall shape looks like a classic crustacean burrow cast (the bulbous end being it's lair, flaring out slightly at the top of the tunnel).
As Pete suggests, if it were bone then the internal trabecular structure should be very obvious in the broken sections.
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hoodie07
Thanks for your response guys....

What about this then?

15955102452891460539857939248054.jpg 
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hoodie07
Sorry I forgot to attach the rest of the link

https://photos.app.goo.gl/Cz4t8etC3G2Yhjsp8

https://photos.app.goo.gl/c85GHoCgFkxafyjh9

Could the original photo of the said bone not be a pubis?
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Gary W
There is no bone structure, just concretions that happen to be in the shape of a bone.
Gary
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prep01
I cannot see any evidence of any bone, but sharp, still photos with a scale (a ruler is best) of the broken ends would help.
Colin Huller
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MartynH
Hi, have to admit whilst bone shaped these do look more like burrows than bone - if you clean up one of the breaks the inside of the 'bone' should look like the attached picture (which is a fragment of dinosaur bone but fully representative of bone structure) - if the inside of the specimen has no honeycomb structure then
your fossils are preserved burrows.

 12381756-B0D1-4747-BC30-DEE324A3FC98_1_201_a.jpeg 
Martyn H
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hoodie07
Hi all, thank you for your input so far!

Attached I have photographed what I think might be a spine and end of tail...... Also, attached a couple of other photos of spine/end of tail is situ and other 'bones' I collected from there together with some cross-sections....

I get the argument about see valid bone marrow, very valid comment........... I would say that it is not smacking me in the face with observing this.

I the meantime I have contacted a few palaeontologists and had a response from two.

The first said 
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One of the images looks like you may have a bivalve (like a clam or scallop).  From the image, I don’t see any fossil bone material.  My colleagues will add if they see something that I don’t see or missed.  They are much better at identifying from images
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The second said specifically in response to the tomahawk bone when I asked whether it could be pubis? 
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It looks intriguingly like one. Additionally, some of the objects might be pedal phalanges (toe bones). However, it is difficult to tell simply from photographs, especially when we can't see the texture close up. My suggestion is that when you can, take them to a natural history museum or a university with vertebrate palaeontologists, and they can check in person



Click image for larger version - Name: A7ABF3B6-B959-4F62-944B-299353B55A66.jpg, Views: 28, Size: 414.98 KB Click image for larger version - Name: A7ABF3B6-B959-4F62-944B-299353B55A66.jpg, Views: 26, Size: 414.98 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_222949.jpg, Views: 25, Size: 488.85 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223039.jpg, Views: 24, Size: 381.46 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223108.jpg, Views: 26, Size: 546.03 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223128.jpg, Views: 25, Size: 339.96 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223215.jpg, Views: 23, Size: 484.18 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223233.jpg, Views: 22, Size: 343.77 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223246.jpg, Views: 23, Size: 424.40 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223253.jpg, Views: 24, Size: 426.45 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223259.jpg, Views: 26, Size: 423.15 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223303.jpg, Views: 26, Size: 347.86 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223409.jpg, Views: 27, Size: 425.70 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223419.jpg, Views: 32, Size: 505.26 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223427.jpg, Views: 29, Size: 343.25 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200723_223446.jpg, Views: 29, Size: 479.35 KB
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hoodie07
MartynH wrote:
Hi, have to admit whilst bone shaped these do look more like burrows than bone - if you clean up one of the breaks the inside of the 'bone' should look like the attached picture (which is a fragment of dinosaur bone but fully representative of bone structure) - if the inside of the specimen has no honeycomb structure then
your fossils are preserved burrows.

 12381756-B0D1-4747-BC30-DEE324A3FC98_1_201_a.jpeg 


Doesn't look like this Marytn
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Dirty Pete
This animal seems to have a belemnite for a tail..........interesting......

Pete
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hoodie07
Dirty Pete wrote:
This animal seems to have a belemnite for a tail..........interesting......

Pete


That was just in the area. Please focus on the other pieces
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hoodie07
Me again, I've managed to partially exposed some areas, and underneath, to me anyway, it looks like bone.

I also attached a cross section of a broken bone. I don't know how much space one would expect the bone marrow to take up. However there is a round circle on both pieces indicating that COULD be it (bone marrow?) Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200724_011429.jpg, Views: 36, Size: 499.86 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200724_011408.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 442.33 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200724_005901.jpg, Views: 36, Size: 357.49 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200724_005712.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 431.33 KB
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advantage
Agree with with everyone else, not bone, concretions  that happen to vaguely resemble bone. There is not  real defined uniformity in the shapes, the internal section would have the honeycomb like structure already mentioned and shown in the above photograph, trabecula I believe. 

Often the eye see an object as something  the brain wants it to be, it doesent mean it is. Looks like bone..but it with all the good will in world its not. 

Steve
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prep01
This is a concretion, probably a burrow of a lobster. THERE IS NO EVIDENCE OF BONE STRUCTURE in any of your photos. Photo 13 is a belemnnite qith the phragmacone attached.
Colin Huller
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Gary W
Almost every week someone posts something which they believe to be 'bone' or 'a tooth'  but they are usually just concretions or a piece of flint.
Gary
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SLStephen
You might want to take them to some academics in an University, they might be able to identify the finds properly. It is very difficult to make a decision based on photos. University of Leeds has a very good department. 
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hoodie07
Just wanted to have a quick comment to thank everybody for their input it's much appreciated!
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