GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
fossils-uk
in my professional opinion this will definitely not open up with a hammer and chisel. There are not any localities wher eyou can take a hammer and chisel to a pebble and it opens up fantastic. Lyme regis, whitby amd isle of skye are the ones where this does occur.
The ammonite looks like some kind of Schlothemia type ammonite .. in fact it looks like Schlothemia angulata. Ammonites from that coastline are not uncommon but good ones most certainly are. As a professional preparator i would suspect that this will not turn out too good even with air tools, but it will certainly look better than it does now.  
I am sure there are professional preparators other than the ones mentioned above in the lyme Regis area that could also tackle your ammonite. 
I sadly can not as i no longer take on other peoples prep work. :-( 
byron 
fossils-uk, whitby
Quote 0 0
Lucy

SAM_0190.JPG SAM_0188.JPG 

 

I found this recently on the foreshore at Llantwitt Major and (as a total beginner) would value members' opinion on whether its worth trying to release from the rock?  This is my first ever find so I don't want to smash it to pieces!

 

Lucy
Quote 0 0
Phileas fossilis
I'd say go for it. Use a chisel if you can support it well or the square end of a geological hammer to crack it open. One side tends to be better preserved with ammonites of this size so choose which side you knock off carefully.

Quote 0 0
Lucy
Appreciate the advice Phileas, I'll let you know how I get on
Quote 0 0
Phileas fossilis
No probs. Cant wait to see!

Quote 0 0
AMARSH
Hi Lucy
 

If I was you I'd probably wait until you've found a few more which can practice on before you attempt this one. I damaged many a nice fossil trying to remove matrix. Its gutting when you're prized specimen breaks :(

 

Andrew
Andrew Marsh
Quote 0 0
spider
Lucy, Ammonites from this locality are very rare so I would advise you to get it prepped professionally by someone. Please dont wack it with a hammer and chisel, but wait and get it done properly sometime in the future.
Have a nice day :0)
Quote 0 0
dinogary
hi lucy
i ruined a few fossils when i first started finding them, find some right broken or scabby ones and have a practice first

 

nice find though
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
That's rather nice, I agree get a professional to do this one as it could turn out well.

Spider - are you sure that ammonites from this locality are very rare? There were quite a few large, albeit poorly preserved ones there on the foreshore when I went last year.

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
spider
ThomasM wrote:
Spider - are you sure that ammonites from this locality are very rare? There were quite a few large, albeit poorly preserved ones there on the foreshore when I went last year.

 

Thomas, Crushed and poorly preserved ammonites maybe not, but as you can see this one is preserved in 3D.
Have a nice day :0)
Quote 0 0
Phileas fossilis
The underside looks like it will cleave out quite easily (and looks the best preserved side) but agree with the other guys to ask a professional would be sensible. They would probably use a chisel in the right spot which is always a best bet that you learn through experience.
Quote 0 0
Lucy
Thanks for all the valuable advice--I think I will leave it in the hands of a more experienced person though
Quote 0 0
Anthony Rybak

Looks like a perfect specimen to practice on. the hammer and chisel method works well with this type of eroded nodule. Give it a sharp tap at approx 40 degrees with a sharp chisel.

Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us