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orangepeel
found when digging a trench for a concrete base for a wall to be built in norfolk, england
Any info would be great as we arent sure! Click image for larger version - Name: 20200821_112447.jpg, Views: 26, Size: 301.04 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200821_112454.jpg, Views: 27, Size: 334.39 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200821_112501.jpg, Views: 20, Size: 263.94 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200821_112521.jpg, Views: 20, Size: 268.81 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200821_112513.jpg, Views: 20, Size: 265.84 KB
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Dirty Pete
That's a nice sea urchin (echinoid) preserved in flint by the look of it so probably from the Cretaceous.

Pete
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orangepeel
Thanks Pete! That's awesome, I thought from some research it may have been an echinoid!
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prep01
Very badly crushed, so no further ID I'm afraid.
Colin Huller
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Gary W
Pretty sure it is a Micraster
Gary
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Elbert
Hello, @Biggus Fossus@ Gary, I must disagree; I think this is (was) a regular urchin...it`s irregularly broken...

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Gary W
Might be a distorted regular or on second thoughts Echinocorys, I have found these so crushed they look li,e this one.
Gary
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prep01
That's why I posted that we could not give an ID!!
Colin Huller
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