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sarahsmpsn
2F5A8E8F-25D2-4F75-B6B7-D5ACA02D459E.jpeg 
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Barrow Museum
It is either a fragment of the test of an echinoid (sea urchin), in which the pores in the calcite test have been replicated by flint, or the impression of a fragment of a Cretaceous bivalve shell, from the family Inoceramidae.  There are several different genera occurring in the Chalk (from where this piece of flint originated).  You could tell for sure by cracking it open but I am slightly inclined to think it is the former from what little can be seen.  In either case, the original shell material will have been calcite, which has dissolved and it would have been part of a living sea creature some 90 million years ago..
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sarahsmpsn
Thank you so much for your reply. How do you think we could go about trying to crack it open?? 
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prep01
I wouldn't suggest trying to do anything to this  flint nodule - it isn't worth the risk to you or the possible partal fossil - I'm sure you will find much better fossils in flint.
Colin Huller
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Barrow Museum
I agree,  You will find much better and complete sea urchins and bivalves with some patience and perseverance.  If you have a local geological society, try going on one or more of their field trips for guaranteed success.  If you hit this one with a hammer, the chances are that it would shatter where you didn't want it anyway, irrespective of the risks of flying shards of razor-sharp flint.
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