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Suse
We are in Biggin Hill Valley, Kent - approx 70 miles from Dover and approx 600ft above sea level - the highest point above sea level in Greater London (although until 1965 Biggin Hill came under Kent).  So we're a bit perplexed to have found a Brachiopod fossil in our very chalky garden (the whole area is extremely chalky)  whilst digging out a pond!  Is it normal to find fossilised sea creatures so far inland/so high above sea level?     
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prep01
Hello Suse and welcome to the forum. The one word answer is - yes! The chalk can be 100 or more metres thick in places where it has not been eroded by glaciers, erosion etc.
May I suggest cleaning it up and posting photos of each aspect of it with a scale on each please? I should be able to give you at least a genus.
Colin Huller
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Suse

Thanks for the reply, Colin - and GOSH!    

I was run over in an adjacent road by a boat a few years ago - a freak accident which is perhaps not looking quiet as freakish now!! 

As we are novice "accidental" fossil hunters, could I ask what is the best way of cleaning the fossil up without causing any damage - as being chalk its going to be quite fragile, I'd imagine?   

 

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prep01
Could I have spme pics please?
Colin Huller
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