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AMARSH
Hi Dave, yes I see what you're getting at. On a different note - and I'm probably being really stupid here -  most of the stigmaria fossils I've seen seem to be fossilized in sandstone as moulds , so how do they fossilize? Theres no mineralization, no obvious infill etc. As I say, I'm prob being thick, but would love to know the answer.
Andrew Marsh
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dark
from wales , Lepidodendron sp
 

 

 

next 2 pics same fossil

 


you got to look to see
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cabby
Hi Dark....nice piece looks like Stigmaria ?
    Cheers Cabby
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spider
Im pretty sure Cabby is correct, It shows a lot of detail, Nice!
Have a nice day :0)
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dark
hi cabby ,
you may be right as all my id,s are open for question ( no expert ) and all suggestions welcome

 

regards

 

 
you got to look to see
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dark
hi just reread my original post and its not clear that the first pic is one fossil the next two pics are a different fossil , should have made that clearer sorry .
you got to look to see
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TqB
They're both Stigmaria which is the rooting organ of Lepidodendron so you weren't far off!
I keep finding bits in Pennine streams and can't stop bringing them homeSmile.

Stigmaria.JPG 
Tarquin
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dark
thanks bud Wink
 

nice set of fossils , 
you got to look to see
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beck man



Stigmaria mate herse one from me beck. B.MPicture_191.jpg 
Only when all the trees have been cut down.Only when all the rivers have been poisond.Only when all the fish have been cought.Only then will you realise you cant eat money. Naitive American Warning!
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dinogary
very nice finds Clap
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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Bow1980
Where in Wales is it from Dark?
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dark
first one was just in England at Forest of dean , 2nd one was from gwent
you got to look to see
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Naze Dave
Good stuff, i wonder why they have different names even though it is known they're from the same plant?
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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TqB
Hi Dave,
Stigmaria is a form genus that goes with various stems. The names are old and were given before it was known which bits went together.
Tarquin
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AMARSH
Hi Dave, I think they have different names because when they were first collected the roots, bark, and leaves etc were all assumed to be different species (hence the different names). It was only when more complete specimens were discovered that it was realised they were in fact different parts of the same plant.
 

Nice fossils btw. I have a lump myself - collected a few years ago from Crail, on the Fife Coast.

 

Andrew
Andrew Marsh
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Naze Dave
Hi guys 
I dont think i explained myself properly sorry, what i mean is, now it is known that these fossils are from the same type of plant, why aren't the names changed to reflect this? if complete or substantial specimens are known then surely it shouldn't be too hard a job?
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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Hz
I have the same question, how is it that the stigmaria I found at the weekend is a solid cylinder of what looks like Sandstone? All the other rocks in the river also look to be of the same sandstone, I don't see how the stigmaria fossil could have been cast/formed from a mold. I read that a mold has to fill with underground water that seeps through, depositing minerals. Can such minerals look like sandstone?? My find is very tough but grainy. I confess, I dropped it by accident, and thankfully it didn't break! It left a WHITE mark... silicon?
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Dirty Pete
Maybe the internal parts of the root were soft and rotted away quickly allowing the same sediment that enclosed it also to fill it. The harder outer 'bark' would then carbonise and eventually disappear leaving an internal sandstone mold. Anybody got a better idea?
Pete.
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MicroFossilMan
Hz wrote:
I read that a mold has to fill with underground water that seeps through, depositing minerals.

It doesn't have to be a mineral, it can also be sediment, as Dirty Pete suggests. Lots of ammonites have calcite (a mineral) filling the earlier chambers, but the final chamber filled with "mud". Whatever is around that does the job will produce an internal mould.
MFM
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