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nomadiclifeguide
After a recent trip to these, we left most disapointed.

LIVERPOOL
Many of the cases are very poorly lit, badly labelled and the contents have no seeming relationship to each another. Often labels are missing or information in general is scant.

There is a corridor beside their rather impressive giant palm frond that has the atmosphere and appearance of a hospital corridor.


MANCHESTER
Although they have some impressive specimens, many of there exhibits wouldn't even make it into my own collection. Their ammonites in particular are quite rough, they rely heavily on casts, which arn't always labelled as such and some of the labels are hard to find as they are well away from the specimen in question.

I feel that for two of our major cities, in one of the most developed countries in the world, indeed, the birth place of Paleantology, things should be rather better.
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Gandalf the White
Do you think your ammonites from the earlier post could go into one of the museums???
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nomadiclifeguide
No I would not suggest that at all. It is far to insignificant.
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nomadiclifeguide
nomadiclifeguide wrote:
No I would not suggest that at all. It is far to insignificant.


Although I am not aware of any examples in their collections from this particular location, which is a very important site when it comes to study of the mass mortality of ammonites. So maybe they could do with something at least from there.
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MicroFossilMan
If you want to see a good museum, visit the Oxford Museum of Natural History. One of the best in the country IMHO.
MFM
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nomadiclifeguide
Noted, thanks. We like a good museum, its just a shame they are getting harder to find these days. We think the majority are being changed into dumbed down visitor centres with glossy information boards that don't really tell you anything and a lack of very impressive specimens.
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prep01
Sedgewick in Cambridge is excellant as well. Needed to compare a specimen I had with one of their's  - most helpful.
Colin Huller
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nomadiclifeguide
Again, thank you. Will take a look if passing on our travels.
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MicroFossilMan
nomadiclifeguide wrote:
We like a good museum, its just a shame they are getting harder to find these days. We think the majority are being changed into dumbed down visitor centres with glossy information boards that don't really tell you anything and a lack of very impressive specimens.

Exactly so!
MFM
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nomadiclifeguide
It is almost like there is a conspiracy to make people stupid. (More stupid I mean)

Education is hugely dumbed down, museums seem to be aimed at kids only and libraries are closing everywhere.

People can't seem to find the vital energy to to type the word 'are' anymore, prefering to use 'R', 'for' is now '4' and I can't keep up with all the accronims. I gues as long as we have imoji's everything will be just fine.[confused][eek][bawl][mad][mad][mad]
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prep01
Please don't start me on this subject! I use imojis occasionally but I don't know what most of them mean / can't see the difference between some of them [confused] but this site tells you what they mean.
Colin Huller
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Brittle Star
Sorry Rob, what is rubbish.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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Gerald Gibson
Cambrian Rockhound:

You are fortunate that your two cities at least have fossil exhibits.  Living in the Bible belt as I do, the august fathers of Fort Worth's Natural History Museum decided that such exhibits, because of their evolutionary implications which run contrary to Creationism, would offend the citizens of this city, so they included as a "curiosity corner" an assembly of fossils quite inferior to my own collections.  They're not even labeled.  They have two dinosaur exhibits shown in the main hall instead of a paleontology wing as do the museums in other states that merely explain what the beasts are.  To make up for this glaring discrepancy, they have a huge exhibit dedicated to Texas oil history and another to the history of cowboys.  Inexplicably, the one major addition to the Fort Worth Museum complex was a Museum of Cowgirls.  Unfortunately, despite the great number of excellent fossil sites, one of which is practically on my own property, there are no fossil clubs here, the nearest one being in Dallas.  I have found two separate species of oysters, pelecypods, and ammonite fragments in one spot across the street from my house.  If I dug down far enough in my backyard, who knows what I might find! 

I love Texas.  It still has many good points.  It's where my daughter's family lives.  Nevertheless, I miss California, where I began hunting for fossils.  It has a respectable museum in LA where there is a Natural History museum with a large paleontology wing and, in La Brea, the famous tar pits.  There are countless smaller museums, not to mention exhibits in neighboring San Diego.  Here in North Texas, there is not the interest I found in Southern California....Oh well, at least we appreciate our local history (cowboys, cowgirls, oil, and fracking). 

---- Phacops
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prep01
was oil created then?
Colin Huller
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nomadiclifeguide
Of course it was, on the fifth day if memory serves. Thats thinking ahead for you.
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prep01
LOL!
Colin Huller
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