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Welsh Wizard
Thanks Cinders

That solves that mystery.

You do see quite a bit of fossilised driftwood along that bit of the coast and it's quite easy to confuse for bone.

Nick
"Whether you think you can or you think you can't, then you're probably right".......Henry Ford
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sal7373
Hi all,
Found this at Llantwit Major 25.8.11 any ideas regarding identification would be great thanks.

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Bottom right hand corner is what looks like a another piece of bone projecting out of the matrix
Loves school holidays - cus every day can be a fossil day :-)
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sal7373
Bottom right hand corner of pic 2 is what looks like another piece of bone projecting out of the matrix
Loves school holidays - cus every day can be a fossil day :-)
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AndyS

Iƒâ€š‚´d say thatƒâ€š‚´s a Pinna bivalve.

AndyS

Visit my liassic ammonites (+ other fossils) blog at andysfossils.com
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TqB
Hi Sal,
 

I think Andy's right.
Tarquin
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spider
I think Andy's nailed the ID to. Nice findThumbs Up
Have a nice day :0)
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dinogary
think so too it looks quite large for a pinna specimen ??
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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Phileas fossilis
There are some pretty big modern pinnas of a foot long or more. I guess this just a big fossil pinna!

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TqB
Some of the Lias Pinnas get really big - I've got one from the Yorkshire coast Lower Lias that's over 16" long even though it's not complete..
Tarquin
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cinders
Definately Pinna., no doubts at all.
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dinogary
never realised they grew to those lenghts... live and learn every day Cool
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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Welsh Wizard
Sal

Pinna are very common along this stretch of the coast but you tend to see them as either as fragments on large rocks or in cross section looking like hieroglyphic eyes so well done for finding one that looks pretty intact.

I was brought up in llantwit major, which gave me my interest in fossils and the Jurassic period, although fossil collecting can be pretty poor along that stretch of coast, unless you like devils toenails.

Saying that, a plesiosaur did come out of the cliffs at llantwit in the 1980s and an ichthyosaur was found at Nash point. Also, if I remember correctly, the first ever reported finds of an ichthyosaur were from st donats in the late 1600s.

Nick
"Whether you think you can or you think you can't, then you're probably right".......Henry Ford
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Bow1980
Nick, a plesi from llantwit? any more details, tried a google search but can't find any reference to it.
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Bow1980
forgot to say, I've seen a whole lobster that was found at llantwit, some kid was just randomly hitting a rock and it split perfect to reveal it, LOL 
 

Me personally all i've found is 2 small bits of bone from the Shale

 


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theres some large ammo's kicking about tho

 

 

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Welsh Wizard
Hi Bow
 

It's in a book I've got somewhere. Not sure of the title but I'll have to have a look.

 

It was found in the mid 1980s and was found in a cliff fall on the east side of the beach. If you go to the beach and walk east about 400 - 600 yards along the cliffs, you'll start to find the odd worn large ammonite if you look hard (approx 1 foot - arietes I think) and it was near to here.

 

It was about 9 foot and supposedly went to the cardiff museum. I've been around the museum back room a couple of times and no one there seemed to be aware of it but they do have quite a large collection of fossils including a large number of ichthyosaurs so it may be that it's been forgotten.

 

There used to be a guy called steve howe who worked there (don't know if he still does) and he wrote a short museum publication on fossil sea dragons - he's probably the guy to ask

 

As an aside, there's also what's left of a medieval port at llantwit. At low tide you can trace a large number of trees that have been piled into the ground and possibly formed part of a breakwater. It was destroyed in a storm hundreds of years ago and then locals used to cut off pieces of the uprights to make love spoons. The trunks are now right down to ground level and covered with stones, but they can be easily found and traced in two lines across the rock pool areas (on the east side as well). So if any one goes to Llantwit to collect fossils and they want to look for something different, they can always look for the remains of the harbour.

 

Nick
"Whether you think you can or you think you can't, then you're probably right".......Henry Ford
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plagistoma

I have had the odd ichy bone from Nash and saw part of a jaw in the beds near the tide line there but have never seen a decent bone from Llantwit.


 


steve

It's always great to "shoot" your own
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cinders
Welsh Wizard wrote:

 

It was about 9 foot and supposedly went to the cardiff museum. I've been around the museum back room a couple of times and no one there seemed to be aware of it but they do have quite a large collection of fossils including a large number of ichthyosaurs so it may be that it's been forgotten.

 

There used to be a guy called steve howe who worked there (don't know if he still does) and he wrote a short museum publication on fossil sea dragons - he's probably the guy to ask

 

Nick



 

I remember that piece going to the museum, but after sectioning, it was found to be a log. Much excitement initially - but then great disappointment!

 

Steve Howe still works for the museum, but not as a geologist anymore.

 

cinders
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