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Asterixx
Hi,

thanks for the lively debate.

Are we agreed reptilian ?!

Quagga, two interesting weblinks and a nice tooth - thank you for taking the effort to research this and for posting.
I am more interested in micro-fossils, so it is possible that I tripped over a pelvis or skull in my excitement at find the perfect foram... but seriously, apart from a few otoliths and tiny presumptive fish teeth, there are no recorded vertebrate fossils from this formation. However, dino footprints are found in the formations above (Albian) and below (Barremian) so I live in hope.

Byron, sorry no phosphate deposits here..what a pity!
It is actually a small inland exposure and the only others around who might have salted the ground are a herd of cattle...unlikely....but then again the herder is an old fellow minus a few teeth - I'd better check him out... tell him a joke and wait until he smiles..

thanks again,

Brian


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Asterixx
Hi,

hope you can help.

i have a tooth fragment which I found washed out of a small exposure of lower cretaceous rocks (Aptian) in the Algarve, Portugal. The rocks represent estuarine, freshwater and terrestrial environments but as the tooth was not in situ I cannot be exact about the source stratum.

Length about 15mm, max width 8mm. Slightly oval in section and ridged along the two edges.

Any ideas?

....please let me down gently if you think it might just be a stray dog tooth

thanks for any help

Brian

IMG_0972_close.jpg 


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beatpete
Croc?
Beatpete
----------------
Anywhere for little ammonites, twice as far for big ones!
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Asterixx
Beatpete,

thanks for that....I was hoping it might be.

Brian

ps apologies to everyone for posting in the wrong subforum
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quagga
I'd agree ...  certainly looks croc to me.
Time is nature's way of stopping everything happening at once.
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Asterixx
Quagga,

Excellent  - thank you for the confirmation

Brian
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fossilsss
I disagree, sorry . looks like mosasaur , judging by shape , structure and age.
fossils, in a big world
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fossilsss
fossils, in a big world
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Asterixx
Hi fossilsss,

thanks for your suggestion and posting the photo. "My" tooth is less tapered than most of the ones in your photo, but certainly not dissimilar to the two on the left of the bottom row.

The deposit is about 118 mya - does that make it a bit old for a mosasaur ?

As an innocent in these matters are there any detailed features I should look for which would help me to decide between the two suggested IDs?

thanks for your post,

Brian
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beatpete
Hi all
I'm no expert, and it's probably Mosasaur, but having read that "The rocks represent estuarine, freshwater and terrestrial environments", it sounded like a perfect environment for crocodiles.
And I found this on the internet, that looks pretty similar to Asterixx's tooth:
http://academic.reed.edu/biology/courses/bio342/2011_syllabus/2011_websites/akmj_death_roll_website/adaptation.html

Beatpete
----------------
Anywhere for little ammonites, twice as far for big ones!
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tonyc
The link above reads  'Crocodilian teeth are sharply pointed but conical, having no side edge or serration' but there seems to be a serrated edge visible in the original photo.
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Asterixx
Hi,

The tooth is definitely ridged along the sides and a bit uneven - but not serrated. Going on the sentence from the website, the ridging rules out crocodile....but hey I can live with mosasaur!

There are certainly no open marine sediments in the section, just some estuarine strata.

Thanks for the interest and help.

Brian
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quagga
The ridge or carina does not entirely rule out crocodile. 
see http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/0_0_0/njau_04
I have found a small croc tooth with a serrated carina in the Weald of South East England :
croctth3.jpg 
(scale bar 1mm)
I have also found croc teeth with a carina but no serrations.  These are from a similar early Cretaceous (Valanginian) fresh-water deposit.
That said, the fresh-water / estuarine setting does not entirely rule out mosasaur either.
 see http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/running-ponies/2012/12/19/pannoniasaurus-inexpectatus-worlds-first-freshwater-mosasaur-found/
I'd be interested to see any other vertebrate material from this location.

Al
Time is nature's way of stopping everything happening at once.
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fossils-uk
Did someone drop their Moroccan mosasaur tooth on the the beach and you found it?
Another idea ... Do the phosphate deposits in morocco extend over to Portugal? Certainly deposits that yield meg teeth in morocco are same as those found in Florida over that side of the pond.
A few ideas to float out there. ;-)
fossils-uk, whitby
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Brittle Star
Hi Rob, please check the date on the previous post, again over 4yrs old
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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