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deltapodus
The aptychi I have have all been flattened - at least, as far as I can tell. Interesting to see one that isn't. 
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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TqB
I don't collect ammonites much but thought this rather average 8" one was worth doing something with, a) because it's a Lytoceras and b)because it has what looks like an associated anaptychus.

It's a Lower Lias one from the N. Yorkshire coast (Luridum Subzone I think) and is rather soft preservation, basically a clay internal mould with a bit of a hard nodule in the centre.
You can't see the nodule here, I had to stick half of it back on and then prep from the top.

I practised some restoration on it, filling a few gaps with Milliput and then painting with pigments in very thin varnish.

As collected:
IMG_0792_-_Copy.JPG 

Glued, penned a bit and filled, the probable anaptychus is at the bottom:
IMG_0845_-_Copy.JPG 

Filler touched up.
IMG_0868_-_Copy.JPG 

Anaptychus closeup - the shiny black layer with growth lines (lost slightly in prep) is typical, wasn't sure if it was a bivalve or not but it looks right (thanks, Andy!)
IMG_0809_-_Copy.JPG 

Needs some tidying but I'm leaving it for now.


Edited by TqB 2014-11-21 15:22:22
Tarquin
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fossil mad
Nice one Tarquin, good restoration job.
"When can we go fossil hunting again?"
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Hydrangea


Great find Tarquin, nice repair job.


Regards.

Roy D.
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valh
Hi Tarquin! Glad to see the lovely restoration specimen.
Valerij
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aurelius
Great ammonite and fantastic restoration. I'd be fascinated to hear more details about how you disguised your repairs - I'd never be able to spot the restoration without the 'before' photo!
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TqB
Thanks, everyone!

The Milliput was shaped wet, while still soft, to give some ribs and texture (using a small, slightly rough ended bit of stick).
I mixed dry artists' pigments in very thin violin spirit varnish which I happen to have ( well thinned with meths) - thin stops it going shiny - applied with small watercolour brushes.

Pigments used were: Ivory Black, Indian Yellow, Alizarin Crimson and Ultramarine Deep. Roughly six coats, largely the black with the other colours to tint it.

The colouring took less than half an hour - it's not perfect but then it's a rough ammonite.
IMG_0845_-_Copy_2.JPG 

IMG_0868_-_Copy_2.JPG 
Tarquin
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Doggerfan
Very good restoration job! And that certainly appears to be an Aptychus, making it something very special and well worth the effort!
Best wishes from the Lake of Constance. Roger.
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TqB
Thanks, Roger! As it seems to be a one piece beak, perhaps "anaptychus" is appropriate? - although I admit to being repeatedly confused by different publications.
Tarquin
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Doggerfan
As far as I understand it, "anaptychus" stands for one of them and "aptychus" for the entire apparatus with 2 parts, although you can also say "anaptychi" when you've got more than one of them... I generally just say aptychus without thinking further...

Edited by Doggerfan 2014-11-24 13:15:35
Best wishes from the Lake of Constance. Roger.
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Everhardus
Love the prepwork  you did. I didn't know Milliput but i just might try some for some restauration projects i have over here. Thanks for the idea. greets,Marcel
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deltapodus
That's great work - the anaptychus - is it preserved in 2d or 3d? 
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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fussy fossiler
Very nice find & superb repair & prep tarquin

Sarah ƒ°…¸‹Å“¢â‚¬ 
"Gravy !?, I love gravy its' us northerners favourite soft drink "
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TqB
Thanks, everyone!

Deltapodus - the anaptychus has some curvature but may be a bit compressed.
Tarquin
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TqB
Deltapodus - that's because the aptychi that you usually find are actually different structures from this.
The clearest statement of the difference that I can find is:

"The jaw apparati of the Jurassic-Cretaceous ammonites possess wide,
shovel-like lower jaws without cutting-edges. They consist either of an
undivided chitinous plate (Anaptychus) or of this and two additional
calcitic plates (Aptychi) on its outer flanks."

- from the abstract of this paper:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02988134

So I gather that aptychi are the mineralised plates that some types of ammonite don't have.
They all have an anaptychus but it isn't seen nearly as often due to the lack of calcification.


Edited by TqB 2014-12-02 10:09:24
Tarquin
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