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Tabfish
Hi Daniel
I think all has been identified except for image 1 and although very water rolled I think it is more like a Androgynoceras or Euagassiceras type ammonite, hard to tell though.
Is the double ammonite in a delicate sedimentary rock?

Tabfish Edited by Tabfish 2016-02-10 23:33:29
Tabfish at the Waterside
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Daniel
I went to Mappleton in December and made some good finds. I found 3 dacs, one Arnioceras multiblock, a few Gryphaea, a few ammonite fragments, a worn Arnioceras and loads of crinoids, corals and bivalves. There were plenty of pebbles on the beach and there was one cliff collapse. The car park is very close to the edge of the cliff so I think it will be closed soon (if it isn't closed now.)

I'll post pictures of my finds later.


Daniel
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Tabfish
Hi Daniel
Glad to see you had a day (and a good one by the sound of it) on the Holderness.
Can't wait to see your finds.

Tabfish
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Daniel
Hi. Here are all my finds exept the Arnioceras multiblock which is in Lyme Regis being prepared. Most of the fossils shown below have'nt been prepared yet so I'll post more pictures when I finish them.


Daniel201629183834_1455043205796.jpg 201629184041_1455043281235.jpg 201629184454_1455043609790.jpg 
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prep01
Hi Daniel, that last ammo which is in half in the nodule would look really good polished in its nodule. Don't know if you've done this before so if you haven't, instructions are in the 'GUIDES' >ADVICE & TIPS section on here (No. 8) Guess who wrote it!
Colin Huller
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Daniel
Thanks for the reply. Did you write the fossil preparation guide on the uk fossil network website? Its very helpful.

thanks,

Daniel
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Daniel
Hi Tabfish. Thanks for the reply. Have the peat deposits been exposed on the beach recently?


Thanks,

Daniel
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Tabfish
Hi Daniel
What a coincidence! about two hours ago I was talking to a friend about remains that I found in the peat.
The peat bed at Tunstall is usually exposed, sometimes well and other times not so well, depends on what nature decides to do.
The best one I have ever seen was along the sea front at Witherensea, it seemed to stretch the whole town front, it did not last long though because the conditions that had exposed it soon covered it over again.

Tabfish
Tabfish at the Waterside
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Daniel
Thanks for the reply. Are mammal fossils common in the peat deposits?

Thanks,

Daniel
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Tabfish
Sorry to ask you for some closer images Daniel of your specimens, especially the ammonites in the matrix near the ruler.
Looks like a decent days collecting, well done.

Tabfish
Tabfish at the Waterside
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Tabfish
Good question Daniel.
'Recent fossils' are not common at all in the peat and if you find anything you are very lucky.
Tree stumps, conkers, reeds and anything else but 'recent bones'.
2000 years ago, or so i understand the cliff/sea was 3 miles further out, although civilisation lived around were we are now and left there mark.

Tabfish
Tabfish at the Waterside
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prep01
No, Byron from Whitby did that one!
Colin Huller
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Hydrangea


Hi Daniel - I was at Tunstall the other day. There is a small exposure of the peat beds on the beach with the usual twigs and logs exposed. It's not easy to find, but there is also a row of wooden posts and wattle fence in the grey clay (sorry no pictures) which prove people were at the site thousands of years ago. The Roos Carr figures, now in the Hull and East Riding museum, were found in similar deposits a couple of miles away. As Tabfish says, bones are not common but it is worth a look.

Roy D.
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Daniel
Thanks for the replies


Daniel
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Daniel
Hi. Here are some more close up images of my finds. I sanded the worn ammonite more today so the inner whorls are visible. Is it an Arnioceras sp?
Daniel2016210202222_1455135846094.jpg 201621020247_1455135932192.jpg 2016210202452_1455136012177.jpg 
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Daniel
2016210202620_1455136096928.jpg 2016210202737_1455136173964.jpg 2016210202834_1455136234019.jpg 
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Daniel
Also my Dad found this ammonite fragment. Any ideas on the species? It looks to me like it could have come from the Speeton clay.
Thanks,
Daniel2016210203234_1455136412710.jpg 2016210203330_1455136523538.jpg 
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prep01
Hi Daniel, your second photo looks like a Kosmoceras and the crinoid ossicles in the next photo I think are oof the genus Pentacrinites, both from the Oxford clay. The ammo in the nodule is coming along well.
Colin Huller
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MicroFossilMan
Daniel wrote:
Also my Dad found this ammonite fragment. Any ideas on the species? It looks to me like it could have come from the Speeton clay.Daniel

If it is from Speeton, could it be an Aegocrioceras?
MFM
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Daniel
Thanks for the replies.

Daniel
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FossilPhil
1st Photo, Arnioceras (?) sp. (AndyS will probably know!)
2nd photo looks like a couple of crushed Kimmeridge clay ammonites.
3rd photo is of crinoid ossicles, probably from the Lias. There are a couple of different isocrinoids found in these rocks, so we probably can't ID it to a species level.
4th photo is not a fossil; probably a banded sandstone/quartzite.
5th and 6th photos are of Gryphea arcuata
Final fossil does not look like it's from the Speeton Clay. A view of the underside will confirm, but I think it is a Lias dactylioceratid.
All the best,
-Phil Edited by FossilPhil 2016-02-10 22:19:56
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Tabfish
If your interested in what is in the peat Daniel then you may be interested in this very old pathway.
You could see were it had come from near the top of the boulder clay cliff about 3ft down but this piece had slumped down as the cliff washed away.

Tabfish
2016210234855_image.jpeg 
Tabfish at the Waterside
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Daniel
Thanks for the replies. The flat ammonites are in a fragile sedementary rock. The pale rock looks more like a coral to me (though I'm probably wrong.) Here are some more pictures.


thanks,

Daniel201621195732_1455184758077.jpg 20162119592_1455184819690.jpg 201621110042_1455184907320.jpg 
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fossilguy

Hi,
 
       Sandstone could be a bit of very worn stigmaria-- fossil Horsetail
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Daniel
Thanks for the reply. However I don't think its a stigmaria.

Thanks anyway.

Daniel
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Hydrangea


Hi Daniel - it isn't a fossil, it's a piece of magnesian limestone. It can form all sorts of weird structures, this is one that caught my attention:-

P1080383.JPG 

P1080384_2.JPG 



Roy D.
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for the reply.

Daniel
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Daniel
Hi. I finished polishing the worn ammonite yesterday. Here are some pictures.

Daniel201621419629_1455476908340.jpg 201621419717_1455476989893.jpg 
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Daniel
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Tabfish
Very nice Daniel!
A fantastic ammonite showing the central Pharagmocone with all of it's different chambers filled with calcite and then finally the living chamber that probably has a mud infill.
Well prepped!

Tabfish
Tabfish at the Waterside
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Daniel
Thanks for the reply.

Daniel
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prep01
Well done!
Colin Huller
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Daniel
Thanks


Daniel
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Hydrangea


A great job Daniel - a nice specimen.

Roy D.
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Daniel
Thanks.


Daniel
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fussy fossiler
Nice job Daniel  I like the internal structure of the ammonite and the calcification in the chambers you've really Brought the detail out 

Cheers

Sarah X
"Gravy !?, I love gravy its' us northerners favourite soft drink "
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Daniel
Thanks.
Daniel
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Daniel
Hi. I got my Arnioceras block back the other day. Most of the ammonites in the block were just fragments but there are 3 good ones on the front and one fairly good one on the back. I think the three Arnioceras may be A.Acuticarinatum, however the keel on the largest one still has some rock on it so I'm not 100% sure. Also on the bottom right corner of the front there is another ammonite, though I have'nt a clue on the species. Any help would be appriciated.


Here are some pictures.



Thanks,



Daniel Click image for larger version - Name: 1457804831953.jpg, Views: 121, Size: 897.57 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1457804866359.jpg, Views: 115, Size: 968.15 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1457804986092.jpg, Views: 90, Size: 785.54 KB
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Daniel
Hi. Here is a picture of the ammonite on the back.


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Daniel
Hi. I forgot to post a side view of the unidentified ammonite.


Here is a picture of the side.



thanks,


Daniel Click image for larger version - Name: 1457860984100.jpg, Views: 51, Size: 741.21 KB
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Hydrangea

Hi Daniel - I think you are right with the Arnioceras Acuticarinatum, the unknown possibly small Euagassiceras Resupinatum??
Roy D.
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for the reply. I'm very happy the Arnioceras are what I thought; they seem a bit rarer than some of the other species. The keel of the ammonite in the bottom right does'nt look quite right to be Euagassiceras to me, but I'm not an expert.


thanks,


Daniel
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Tabfish
Hi Daniel
The first two images i have posted are Cymbites ( identified on this forum a while ago) ammonite next to an Arnioceras sp in a death as-semblance.
Looks a bit like your small ammonite but with different preservation.
The third image is another multi block with an Arnioceras acuticarinatum next to a Euagassiceras sp.
I hope these will help with the id of your ammonites.
Unfortunatly I don't think your biggest one is A,a the ribs slope backwards and the keel looks different.
Very interesting and rare finds from the Holderness.


IMG_2155.jpg 
IMG_2419.jpg 
IMG_2802.jpg 

Tabfish

Tabfish at the Waterside
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for the reply. What species do you think the large Arnioceras could be?


Thanks,


Daniel
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Tabfish
Not sure what it is Daniel, maybe Byron or Andy S could help with the I,D.
It could be a transitional specimen or one that has been pathologically deformed and grew like this, or it could be a perfectly good ammonite not often seen in our area.
The whorles of your ammonite look to rapidly evolve and get 'fatter' then there is the backward sloping ribs, Coroniceras type?
Very nice special find!
Tabfish
Tabfish at the Waterside
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for the reply. I've looked on the internet at pictures of Cymbites and I agree the ammonite in the bottom right looks like it. I'm going to Mappleton again soon; I'll post my finds here.


Thanks,


Daniel
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Daniel
Hi. I've been looking on the internet today to try to find out what my find is, however I don't understand most of the terminology used to identify ammonites eg backward sloping ribs.

can anyone explain some of the most important terms used in IDing ammonites?



thanks,

Daniel
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Daniel
Hi. I visited Mappleton again today, and me and my Dad found many ammonites, Gryphaea, Belemnites and I think one, possibly two marine reptile bones. There were fairly strong winds, which caused the waves to be large. The large waves resulted in only a small area of the beach being possible to get to in the afternoon.




1/2- Very worn Ichthyosaur vertebrae? Found by my Dad
3/4- I think could be bone, though I'm not sure. Found by myself
5- ammonite in a nodule (I think Dactylioceras sp) Found by my Dad
6- I think is a piece of a large ammonite. Found by myself
7- more ammonites
8- Gryphaea Dilatata? Found by myself


Thanks,


Daniel Click image for larger version - Name: 1458419453709.jpg, Views: 80, Size: 975.40 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1458419568973.jpg, Views: 98, Size: 969.04 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1458419636070.jpg, Views: 98, Size: 757.12 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1458419728358.jpg, Views: 99, Size: 739.18 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1458419830174.jpg, Views: 94, Size: 833.57 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1458419880574.jpg, Views: 90, Size: 965.30 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1458419997458.jpg, Views: 88, Size: 910.32 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1458420104709.jpg, Views: 80, Size: 929.96 KB
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Tabfish
Good finds Daniel and Dad.
1/2 Don't know about the Ichth verts, look like bone but the wrong shape although i understand they may have been water rolled.
3/4 Armoured fish bone, got a bit myself!
5 Dac. Dac's from the Holderness seem to me to prep and pop better than anywhere else.  
6 Water rolled large ammonite.
7 Some of these are Gagaticeras gagatium ammonites, they are usually in softer grey matrix and can be prepped by hand.
8 Gryphaea sp.
Low water was aprox 8am and high was aprox 14.15pm (Bridlington) so you did well to find any of the beach visible let alone a fantastic haul of fossils!
Well done.

Tabfish


Tabfish at the Waterside
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for the reply. When I arrived at around 10am the sea was nearly hitting the cliffs to the right of the enterance. I managed to walk around two miles to the left in the morning, however in the afternoon the tide was much closer in. I think I found a theropod dinosaur footprint, however the rock which it was on was too heavy to take off the beach (around 20lbs.) Also I saw a dead dog shark.


If I acid prepare my fish bone do I need to cover the bone or will the acid not harm it?



Thanks,



Daniel
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