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pirsquared

I work at a small aquarium on the west Cumbrian coast and recently a member of the public came in with a tooth found on the beach, we identified it as a fossil megalodon tooth about 3" long it was in an exceptional state of preservation.

The area it was found is known for its carboniferous fossils but megalodons were much more recent,

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Rhaetianpenarth207
Do you have pictures of it. I’m not sure how a meg tooth would have got to a Carboniferous location.
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Anonymous

unfortunately we didn't get a photo, we do have a megalodon tooth in the aquarium and we compared it with this.

I was reading that a lot in interglacial mud was deposited within the solway flood plain during the ebb and flow of the last ice age.

another option could be sediment from dredging being dumped inshore by fishing boats.

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cinders
It would have been useful to have a quick snap of the tooth as it's impossible to say otherwise. However Otodus megalodon (or Carcharocles megalodon) only existed between about 25 million and 3 million years ago, and possibly less than that. Therefore it just could not have got to your area of coastline naturally - and the impressive ones don't come from the UK anyway. My thought would be that it was dropped by someone. A nice find seeing how expensive they are to buy- but unlucky for the person who lost it.
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Rhaetianpenarth207
Yes, the ones from the U.K. aren’t preserved well so it probably came from somewhere else.
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