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Daniel
Hi. I found this in West Yorkshire recently. I posted it on a couple of other forums but no-one was 100% sure whether it's a Millipede or just a plant fossil. The other fossil in the nodule is a plant stem.


It comes from the Pennine Middle Coal Measures formation.

It measures 14mm.


Any help to identify it would be appreciated.


Thanks,


Daniel
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FossilPhil
Doesn't look immediately millipede-like to me. I'd suggest that it is of plant origin, as I cannot see any evidence of segmentation. Albeit, this ID is certainly not set in stone (pun not intended), as the Carboniferous is not my forte!
Aron (wiccaman9) will almost certainly be able to give you an ID; I believe he has several millipedes in his collection.
Hopefully I am wrong!
All the best,
-Phil
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for the reply.


Daniel
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TqB
Still not sure but maybe part of a cone, something like Calamostachys.

Edit: hope that's wrong though!
Tarquin
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for the reply. I also have the other half to it but it isn't well preserved; it seems to be made of small sections; each one looks to have a small dot on it but I was unable to take a good picture.


Thanks,

Daniel
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Daniel
Hi. Here is a picture of the other half. The photo isn't great but the sections of the fossil can be seen.


Thanks,

Daniel Click image for larger version - Name: image.jpg, Views: 121, Size: 580.15 KB
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Daniel
Hi. I managed to take a slightly better image of the other half. It's still not excellent but it's a bit better than the last picture.

Thanks,

Daniel Click image for larger version - Name: image.jpg, Views: 127, Size: 524.55 KB
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wiccaman9
Hi Daniel,

  I'm a little sat on the fence regards this fossil... can we have other photographs?, try moistening the fossil, with regards increasing its contrast etc? 

I'd feel happier to think millipede if there were signs of small nodular structures on the surface of raised segments ie. spiracles, marking the entrances to the tracheal system of the 'respiratory tract'.

 there does not seem to be any indication of limbs (see UK Arthropoda thread of recent)  but they do not always fossilise, being so fragile and soft. There are generic millipedes from Mazon creek in the US where no limbs appear in the nodules, and they do have similarities to your fossil (see photo below).

 As to plant material - Upper Carboniferous sphenopsids like Calamites are a possibility - albeit terminal spikes of material, before the Annularia and Asterophyllites leaves start to appear..????

 Try contrast photographs, side lighting etc to see if any indications of raised segments, with spiracles, etc

 Cheers

 Aron

Mazon creek - generic genus Euphorberia sp.

euphoberia millipede carb, mazon creek and glasgow.jpg 
"I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self contained..."
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Fossil hunter
Could it be a spore cone of Calamostachys?  
https://steurh.home.xs4all.nl/engcrock/ecalstra.html

or Xyloiulus millipede? The curled perservation does resemble the sample from Crock hey pit.
http://www.fossilzone.co.uk/bona.pdf
 
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for the replies. I've taken a few more pictures; two of them show the dots and one of them shows possible limbs.


Thanks,

Daniel Click image for larger version - Name: image.jpg, Views: 208, Size: 524.55 KB Click image for larger version - Name: image.jpg, Views: 223, Size: 524.55 KB Click image for larger version - Name: image.jpg, Views: 217, Size: 423.68 KB
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wiccaman9
That's a better photo Dan

 The undulations seem to resemble a millipedes' body, and I agree 1-2 small 'button' like swellings seem to be there (spiracles)

 - in short, it does appear to be a millipede (compare with my 'better' millipede - UK arthropod thread)

- cool!

 - what was the location?

 cheers

 Aron
"I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self contained..."
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Daniel
Hi. Thanks for your help. That's great news. I found it in a woods in Wakefield, West Yorkshire. It's not easy to find fossils there but some nice fossils can be found.


Thanks,

Daniel
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Fossil hunter
Great find.
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Daniel
Thanks. I'm going to post it to the NHM to see if they can tell me anything more about it eg the species.


Thanks,


Daniel
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Fossil hunter
Would be interesting the hear what they think of the specimen.
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efossil
found this at Offerton, any ideas?

CIMG2910.JPG


CIMG2909.JPG 
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Fossil hunter
Could it be the abdomen of a horseshoe crab(ie Euproops spp.)?
Euproops fossil Westphalian.jpg 

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Brittle Star
Hi
Have you considered it could be a trilobite. Whatever it is it is an excellent fossil.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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Daniel
Hi. I took a better picture of the possible millipede and was wondering if it's possible to be sure if its a millipede?


Thanks,


Daniel

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NXD
Fossil hunter wrote:
Could it be the abdomen of a horseshoe crab(ie Euproops spp.)?
Euproops fossil Westphalian.jpg 



Hello, excuse me sir, where did you find this horseshoe Crab fossils ? or do you know where did it be dug out? for example which country it is? or which city it is?
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Olenus
I’m sure the Horseshoe crab is from Crock Hey opencast pit, Near Wigan Lancashire. Now long gone !


Lee
The Ace of Spades,,,







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