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pwoodger
Here is the Oyster. On the shell there are other shells and growths. I would love it if you could tell me what type of oyster it is.
DSC02292.jpg  DSC02293.jpg    DSC02295.jpg   
I'm hoping on this bottom one you can see a small growth. It looks like a small coral, but I've no real idea. I can't do macro photos. I hope this one is clear enough.
Next:
DSC02296.jpg  DSC02297.jpg  There are two rows of small bumps on each "flank" of this ammonite.

Next:
Again I hope this is clear enough. I think it could be crab or lobster skin.

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prep01
Hi, you don't say where these were found? (This helps to tell the age / geology). Could you also please take more photos of the 1st one fromm different angles? Again with the ammonite, especially looking at one of the broken ends to see the whorl section? The 3rd one also needs more photos (all 4 surfaces and a couple of macro shots of the top and sides)
Colin Huller
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pwoodger
DSC02304.jpg  DSC02302.jpg 
DSC02303.jpg  DSC02301.jpg 
DSC02300.jpg 

I believe I got the oyster from near Redcliffe point. The ammonite is from Seatown.
Sorry can't do macro shots. I'm looking to get a lens. By the way the oyster weighs 1.5 kgs!

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prep01
That oyster looks like a Gryphaea dilatata from the Oxfordian, but may be a very large G arcuata. Please add a scale to all photos. I'm not to good on 'bits' of ammonites, so I will leave that one for someone else! Without a close look at the last one - well, to me it looks like tarmadam or something man-made to be honest.
Colin Huller
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Unregistered
Hi,

a couple of thoughts.

The crinkly edged marks on the oyster may well be the scars of other juvenile oysters (not necessarily the same species) which settled and attached onto the large oyster.

The 'coral' looks like the calcified byssus of a saddle oyster (eg Anomia). Anomia and other related saddle oysters are well represented in the fossil record going back to the jurassic.

just thoughts - could be 100% wrong!

BrianO
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Alex47
If the strata the 'oyster' comes from is Cretaceous then might this be Aetosteron/Exogyra? It certainly looks like the specimens that are common near Whale Chine on the SW coast of the Isle of Wight. My only reservation is size - the Island specimens are much larger.
Alex
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prep01
Alex, they are Jurassic ! (from the location(s) found
Colin Huller
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brym
Liperoceras have "2 rows of bumps on the flank" as you described.

Brian
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