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Romseyflint
We recently took delivery of a large pile of Romsey flint (Hampshire) for our driveway. My 8 yo child found this amongst the flints. I am fairly sure it isn't flint; and it looks like a discoloured shark's tooth to me. In particular it was pointed out to me that there are the remains of what look like serrations along the sharp edges. The 8yo is a budding palaeontologist and thinks it is a fossil. Could anybody help us understand what it is and how it got onto our driveway?  20200906_100055.jpg  20200906_100127.jpg 
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Dirty Pete
Presumably the fossil sharktooth came along with your flint gravel that had been dredged/dug out of a gravel bed/source. Looks like a nice big one and hopefully someone will put a name to it........

Pete.
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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. Yes, this is a very nice shark's tooth with serrations along both edges and the root. With flint being 'won'from several sources - Inland pits, the sea etc, there is no idea where it actually came from, so looks like it comes from the Londaon clay which is part of the Eocene perion around 45 million years old. From your photos (v goood ones) I would suggest it is from a shark called....... Sorry, I can't ID it - I hope someone else on here can.
Colin Huller
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Gary W
Very nice fossil shark tooth.  Preservation doesnt look like london clay, also the serrations are very rare in teeth of that age. 
Maybe from red crag basement bed, i.e. miocene derived,  wherin  the very rare Charcarodon and Isurus can be found.  This is certainly dredged for aggregate offshore.
Gary
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Elbert
Hello, this looks like a Cosmopolitodus escherii, a mako shark that developped serrations without being a Carcharodon...it has no bourlette.
Interesting and rare find indeed!

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Romseyflint
Thank you everybody for your responses (btw what an engaging and friendly site) - we are trying to digest all this information and range of suggestions. Does where the tooth is found help decide on the aging of the tooth? As the suppliers of the aggregate call this Romsey Flint should we just assume this is a generic term and the stone perhaps came from the wider Hampshire basin? Bws Angus
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prep01
1) Does where... - Yes, The underlaying (bedrock) and if there are any ovnerlaying (glacial usually) geology can be checked with geological maps and so determine the age of the fossil.
2)The gravel is glacial, but if it is 'local', then it is probably of Eocene age.
Colin Huller
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Romseyflint
So on the tooth front - a fine serration (which I think is what this tooth has) could be from the Cosmopolitodus escheri which is a late Miocene end of the line cousin to the Great White shark. But can the serrrated edges tie into anything from the time that the gravel comes from - i.e. the eocene age as mentioned by @prep01? And forgive me @Elbert but what is a bourlette? (I am thinking Marie- Antoinette and the French Revolution!)

On another note the colour of the tooth is not of the deep dark browns or blacks that one sees from a lot of the teeth that I have seen (on the internet - I am very new to this!!) - does the colour indicate age at all?

Bws A
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Elbert
Hello, the bourlette is a triangular feature that resides on the lingual (tonge) side of the tooth in between the tooth and the root of it. If you google: Megalodon, in pictures, you `ll see what I mean.

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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nomadiclifeguide
I can't add any info as this lot know far more than me but I just want to say that it's a real beauty, well done! !
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