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woodyx
Hi, new to the forum so no idea of etiquette on the forum so apologies in advance.

We went to Speeton/ Reighton (North Yorkshire) today. I took a very excitable 7 and 12 year old who have pestered me for years to take them fossil hunting. (They loved it and got very messy)

Brilliant day, but, i have such limited knowledge its caused more questions. so please humour me.


A few pics with questions.

20180217_202040.jpg

Any Ideas?


20180217_213910.jpg 

This is really soft slate? how to protect it?





So, now on to the main question.

My son found this pebble, called it the hamburger. it looked too good to be true and i gave it a tap!


20180217_214107.jpg  20180217_214117.jpg 

He then found this! is it worth a tap? Top side is really worn but


20180217_214239.jpg







20180217_214204.jpg  

Thanks so much for the help,

Woody



Other images but no further questions 😉

20180217_122316.jpg  20180217_202028.jpg  20180217_202046.jpg  20180217_213847.jpg
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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. What a great losd of finds on your first outing! I'm no expert on this area, but the first photo looks like it's from rather further North and are parts of an echinoderm (sea lilly) in Carboniferous limestone depsited by a glacier.
The second photo is of a rather crushed ammonite, not in slate but mudstone from the Kimmeridge clay which outcrops to the north of that area.
The third  is commonly known as a 'burger nodule' the burger as you have found out being an ammonite, a Dactylioceras I believe.
The next one is a partial large ammonite from what I can see, but I ca't tell you the genus.

Hope this helps
Colin Huller
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Trilobiter
LOVE the ammonite woodyx! and the brown rock with the white markings are crinoid stems btw.
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woodyx
Thank you for the replies and the help.

Woody
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Crann
woodyx wrote:
Thank you for the replies and the help.

Woody


Woody I think the large Ammonite is a Lytoceras, we found similar, I will post a photo, the inner whorls don't preserve that good but you could be lucky ! Also soak the fossils for around 24hrs in fresh water to extract the salt, the shale/"slate" may start to split, use pva/water mix on the imprint once dried out if you want to keep, Thanks, Alan.
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Crann
There's our Lytoceras, not complete but a rare find... Click image for larger version - Name: 20180219_214853-1008x756.jpg, Views: 26, Size: 196.35 KB
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woodyx
Wow that brilliant! great find, thank you for sharing the photo. don't want to break the big boy,but its tempting to have a little go.

Also thank you for the advice on soaking and preserving.

Woody
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Crann
woodyx wrote:
Wow that brilliant! great find, thank you for sharing the photo. don't want to break the big boy,but its tempting to have a little go.

Also thank you for the advice on soaking and preserving.

Woody


No worries, I must admit I went straight in and tapped the matrix off and it came off in one piece, minor prep work on the whorls, depends on the specimen though, good luck !
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Hydrangea

Good finds Woodyx. I bet the kids are looking forward to the next trip!
The big ammonite is interesting.
Roy D.
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brym
Hi Woody, I think you collected nearly everything worth having. We went this morning and virtually all we found were a few broken ammonites of indeterminate species and a crumbling bivalve. I did though find this partial. I might have a go at prepping it but there's a lot of crumbly pyrite there. Have you guys any suggestions as to species?

Thanks Brian.


speet1.jpg 

speet2.jpg 

speet3.jpg 

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woodyx
Roy and Brym,

Roy
The kids loved it they just ran around for 2 hours getting covered in mud. the big ammonite is interesting? Why? I think it is (i dont know anything) but dont want to damage it, had a little go but stopped.


Brym,
it was the eagle eyes of my wife and the kids, i didnt spot much. The kids were covered from head to toe in mud by the end! We armed them with gardening trowels and told them they were not allowed to climb. But it was the wife that found the most in the clean rocks and pebbles between the clay and the sand. No idea what you have but it looks interesting.

Woody
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brym
I have the same trouble, last year I was over the moon after finding a Plesiosaur vertebra then my wife finds an Ichthyosaur skull not knowing what it was.

Brian 
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Crann
brym wrote:
I have the same trouble, last year I was over the moon after finding a Plesiosaur vertebra then my wife finds an Ichthyosaur skull not knowing what it was.

Brian 


Any photos ? I tend to find Ammonites and the Mrs tends to find bone, strange...
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Crann
Recent find of ours, two articulated Ichthyosaur verts, good size too... Click image for larger version - Name: 20180220_174332-634x676.jpg, Views: 22, Size: 107.77 KB
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brym
I'll dig them out.

Brian
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Crann
brym wrote:
Here are the Plesiosaur vert and Ichthyosaur skull as requested. I'm afraid the skull is a bit of a car crash, you're looking at the eye socket with part of the rostrum wrapped around it, I'm just hoping the sclerotic plates are still in there. The underside is quite interesting being a mix of ribs, clavicles and part of the rostrum.

Brian

Ples.jpg 

ix1.jpg 
ix2.jpg 




Awesome those, can't believe all those teeth on the first photo, we have four loose Plesiosaur verts, two worn articulated verts and a bone block with huge humerus and various ribs etc that I'm still prepping.
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brym
Wow, that's impressive.

Brian
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brym
As I suspected the large Ammonite didn't have an inner whorl, another one for the rockery.

Brian
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Elbert
Hello, at Speeton there is the possability of  finding parts of big heteromorph ammonites; if this is one, there would be no point in trying to find attached inner whorls...

greetings, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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brym
Hi Bert. Even though there wasn't an inner coil I removed most of the matrix just for prep practice. Having seen your post I had another look at it and from the shape of the coil and the considerable difference in size from one end to the other there's no way it could have been coiled. I'm quite pleased, it's my first heteromorph.

Thanks. Brian
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brym
Hi Bert, I've been reading up what I can to try and identify the heteromorph. I might be imagining it but there seems to be a slight bend in the middle of it with the ribs being more bent towards the operculum on the right hand side. Am I right in thinking this would make it one of those like a bent paper clip rather than the loose coiled ones?

Brian

hetero.jpg 
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Elbert
Hello, in the BRG guide Eastern England you`ll find a picture of Aegocrioceras quadratum wich looks like a match for your find; this is a spiral, not a paperclip.
Not a piece you will pick up everyday...
For me this was also my first english heteromorph!

greetings, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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brym
Thanks again Bert.
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