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AMARSH
Hi all, hoping someone can help me ID this partial tooth I found at Kings Dyke, Peterborough this afternoon. The geology is Oxford Clay and I’m certain it’s a tooth - black enamel, conical shaped, striations etc - but it’s partial so I can’t quite work out what it’s from! I’ve never found a reptile tooth before (despite over a decade of looking), so would be very pleased if someone could confirm. Photos attached.... F1BF2A73-FBB1-456F-9961-5037F126956C.jpeg  829AADFF-0D71-43A4-8D82-92EE90FB4C5D.jpeg  90B0179E-4A6D-4983-B2FA-58BD18B103F6.jpeg 
Andrew Marsh
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Rhaetianpenarth207
The points you suggested above would indicate a plesiosaur tooth but I cannot be sure without the tip. Second most likely candidate is probably croc or fish. Nice find! 🙂
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prep01
tip and base missng - no chance!
Colin Huller
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AMARSH
Thanks guys! My gut instinct is plesiosaur, but it’s disappointing that I can't be more certain. Colin - do you mean there’s no chance it’s reptile?
Andrew Marsh
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prep01
Not at all Andrew, post a photo or several of the enamel, cross secton of both ends ALL with a mm scale (you should know better than to omit that (😲) and become a friend of Angelos Mattheau-Raven if you aren't already!
Colin Huller
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AMARSH
Hi Colin

Ok, I’ll try taking some additional photos as you suggest, and failing that I’ll take it to the Sedgwick museum to see whether anyone there can ID it in the flesh. My gut instinct says that’s it’s plesiosaur or croc, but would love for that to be confirmed.

Thanks

Andrew
Andrew Marsh
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AMARSH
In the meantime a flew cleaned up photos... BD1E481F-B2B3-4999-B29B-46CEB934D350.jpeg  6F54C486-42E4-45E2-8338-2369D449D7B4.jpeg 
Andrew Marsh
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AMARSH
Ok here are some more photos. Really hoping someone out there can put me out of my misery.... 323BD57F-FA80-42C9-BC42-93D69701D5A0.jpeg  566B474D-89BD-4F17-96EE-80ED4DE7A909.jpeg  95F80481-221F-41DF-92E4-B62F6CF76A3A.jpeg  B4F4445B-7DDD-4BEA-A146-A534A5D60057.jpeg  7AC16BD2-E3A2-4E88-9EDE-C2E886AEE415.jpeg 
Andrew Marsh
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ophthalmosaur
Andrew

I'd say its almost certainly a plesiosaur or pliosaur tooth - possibly Peloneustes. I've a number of Peloneustes crowns that look identical to that (ridges, conical, no carinae etc.) . Photo attached. 

Paul

Peloneustes tooth large#2tip.jpg
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prep01
Looks good to me!
Colin Huller
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AMARSH
Oh wow! I’m very pleased with that!  Plesiosaur or Pliosaur!! 😺 Question is, if it is pliosaur then where is the rest of it? I feel another trip coming on. I work in Cambridge now, not too far from the Sedgwick, so I’m going to see if I can book an appointment with someone to look through their Oxford clay teeth, see if I can get a positive ID. I’ll let you know how I get on.

Andrew
Andrew Marsh
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AMARSH

Hi all, quick update - I’ve just spent my lunchtime with a very helpful member of the Sedgwick museum team, riffling through their specimen drawers, and I’m now 100% confident that what I have here is a (partial) Steneosaurus tooth 🐊That was my gut instinct when I first found it, so really pleased 😺

 

Andrew Marsh
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ophthalmosaur
I'm not sure you're right on that. Here are some photos of tooth sections from a Peloneustes. See what you think. Last two are from a tooth tip. 

001.jpg  002.jpg  003.jpg  004.jpg  006.jpg  007.jpg 
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AMARSH

Hmm 🤔I’m not sure now. That does look pretty convincing. The only thing I would say is that the enamel on yours looks more textured / rippled. The enamel on mine is pretty smooth by comparison. The croc specimens I handled today were all relatively smooth like mine. The only thing that troubles me slightly is that they appeared to have Steneosaurus and Metriorynchus teeth muddled up in the same boxes, so my ID assumes that they were all correctly identified and labelled in the first place. It seems that the mystery continues 😩

Andrew Marsh
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