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Phileas fossilis
Should be something good in that nodule! Proceed with caution though.

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Rock E




I would grateful for any informationConfused2_x_Amos_1.jpg 2_x_Amos_2.jpg 2_x_Amos_4.jpg 2_x_Amos_5.jpg .



This pair of ammonites where found at Charmouth Dorset UK
West of the river.



The rock was located towards the cliff base partially buried
in the sand/gravel with the fossils face down and resembing a mushroom due to
the eroded under cut.     



John Patrick

Well Iƒ¢¢â€š¬¢â€ž¢ll be a monkeys uncle, or should that be nephew.   
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spider
I think they could very well be Microderoceras birchi which are identifiable from the double row of spine node bases visible on your specimen. It makes sense they are found from that side of Charmouth in the area you describe so nice find Thumbs Up
Have a nice day :0)
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mudbug2
Hi
Thats worth taking home and looking to see whats inside, keep us informed if you have ...

Regards to all who share the passion Mudbug..
S.H.T-N
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Rock E




Dear Spider thank you for your interest and the informationSmile.
After making an internet search for Microderoceras
birchi, which
I presume is the Latin name of the species, and finding other examples I cans
see exactly what you are describing as spine node bases, regards JP
 



John Patrick

Well Iƒ¢¢â€š¬¢â€ž¢ll be a monkeys uncle, or should that be nephew.   
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Rock E




Dear Mudbug thanks for posting, yes the specimen was taken
home.



How would you proceed with further examination? I thought
about looking for any signs on the sides of the rock and then splitting it
along the bedding plane with a cold chisel just above this point and then using
an engraver to slowly remove the matrix, or is that method a bit crude and
would it be better to start with the engraver first.



I must say, at this point, that the specimen was actually
found by my brother so he would be the one to decide whether or not to proceed
with any destructive investigation but it will be a pleasure Big smile to keep you posted,
regards JP



John Patrick

Well Iƒ¢¢â€š¬¢â€ž¢ll be a monkeys uncle, or should that be nephew.   
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spider

I think he is referring to most people would hit the boulbous nodular end to have a look what could be contained within the nodule. With the other ammonites attached 'potentially' there could be a complete Microderoceras inside the rock. Sometimes the nodule will open revealing the contents if hit right but very often whats in there (if anything) could equally feasably be destroyed. Sometimes its just calcite crystals. Its the chance you take. One thing you could do first is cut off the chunk with the visible ammonites on using a rocksaw (ask someone to do it or hire one if you dont have one) and then try and crack the nodule open, at least then you will have saved what you already have. You need a sharp blow using a lump hammer roughly on the central point of the boulbous bit. The bedding planes are indicated by the visible striations in the rock to give you some idea how things should go. Good luck if you attempt it.

Have a nice day :0)
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