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pcgonemud
I had no idea about fossils till recently but after finding a bronze age arrow head and then a couple of pudding stones not long after i've started to collect anything that i've found different or interesting, after stumbling upon this forum i've realised some are fossils and some might be but if anyone could help I have no idea what these are. These were all found at a quarry in hertfordshire. I find this hobby really addictive.  thanks in advance ,Paul.P1010005.jpg  P1010008.jpg  P1010009.jpg  P1010017.jpg  P1010018.jpg
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Brittle Star
Hi

Some of them look sponge related to me. See what others have to say.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. Firstly, I assume these are all from a sand and gravel deposit. This would mean that they are what is known as 'derived'  fossils having been eroded out of a bedrock and transported by a glacier to where they were found. This makes it a lot harder as we cannot tell what rock they were fossilised in and so their age. I am not sure which of your photos are of the same fossil, except for photo 4 which is the mould of a sponge in flint, worn out of the chalk and is 75 - 85 million years old.
Colin Huller
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pcgonemud
thanks for the feedback the photos are all of different finds, i'll try to be more detailed with the photos, i've found loads of pieces and I  am very eager to work out what they all are. On a walk with my wife in Tewin through a farmers field I found a piece of flint with a small ball pushing out of it I had my first go at knocking the stone away and found what i think is an echinoid. Please let me know what you think. P1010027.jpg  P1010027.jpg   
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prep01
Hi, Iyou rightly say'll start with the echinoid as you say, but I will need a profile photo and one of the underneath to be able to give you an ID. OK, let's get back to your original post.
  1. I think this is a section through a coral, a photo of the reverse and profile might help.
  2. The larger part is a bivalve, but I would again need to see the profile and reverse. The object inside the shell I can't see wat it is and needs a bit of a clean.
  3. This looks like a flint nodule, with a few bits of shell and small worm tubes (Serpula). On enlarging and tweaking the photo, there is a 'fingerprint' pattern, but I think this is what we call 'banded flint'.
  4. This is a weathered out sponge in flint but there isn't enough of it to ID.
Colin Huller
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