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deltapodus
One of Ken Mannion's - a TT. 
Jason, I think that's what I was doing wrong - down instead of across. 
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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deltapodus
I spent Saturday 17th at Port Mulgrave - fantastic weather, great finds, including a personal 1st, and I had the place to myself. Help with id would be appreciated - some I think I've got right, others I need someone to tell me what they are.
First up, a Dactylioceras tenuicostatum - one of the personal firsts.
PICT0426.JPG 

Dactylioceras commune (?) in a nodule - judging from what's visible, there's at least 5 in there. Prepping fun awaits.
PICT0433A.JPG  PICT0434.JPG 

Another Dactylioceras - this time in alum shale. 1st pic - as found.
PICT0408.JPG 

2nd pic - after 20 mins work. It needs further cleaning, but I think there's an anomaly with the ribs, suggesting this one had been attacked, but survived. I'll post more as I continue prepping.
PICT0416.JPG 

And what is this on the reserve?
PICT0409.JPG 

Id on this one, please?
PICT0420.JPG  PICT0421.JPG  PICT0422.JPG 


Finally found bone[biggrin]
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deltapodus
Clicked post new topic when I hadn't finished. So a few more pics. 
First time I'd ever seen these outside of a book, or a museum - thanks to Dean Lomax for the tip off on where to look.
Ammonite aptychi.
PICT0429.JPG 
Part and counterpart.
PICT0430.JPG 

Aptychi, with ammonite - id on the ammonite anyone?
PICT0428.JPG 

The largest aptychi I found.
PICT0435.JPG 

Several ammonites - Harpoceras?
PICT0423.JPG 

And a mystery to finish with. I thought this might be plant material - I did find some jet after all - but the closer I look, the less I think plant. I'm starting to wonder if it's an aptychus in cross section. Thoughts?
PICT0427.JPG 
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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Elbert
Hello, your first one looks more like a D. semicelatum, the multi looks, indeed, like D. commune, the flat ammonites are probably Eleganticeras and Tiltoniceras, the small Hildoceras bifrons and very nice Aptychi; are the last ones from the Yetrock or the bituminous shale?
Nice haul !!Clap


 

greetings, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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aurelius
That big
aptychi is very nice indeed, I'm jealous.
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deltapodus
Elbert wrote:
Hello, your first one looks more like a D. semicelatum, the multi looks, indeed, like D. commune, the flat ammonites are probably Eleganticeras and Tiltoniceras, the small Hildoceras bifrons and very nice Aptychi; are the last ones from the Yetrock or the bituminous shale?
Nice haul !!Clap


 

greetings, Bert


D. semicelatum? I stand corrected  Even after twenty years, I find it hard to distinguish some ammonites - that's what you get for paying more attention to dinosaurs than ammonites. 
Eleganticeras are the ones with what I think of as a prong at the opening to the body chamber - correct? and Tiltoniceras the ones without. If I've got this wrong, please enlighten me.

Jet rock or bituminous shale? I found all the aptychi in the loose material in the harbour area. I've just consulted the geological map, and the rocks in that area are labelled as JR, but. confusingly, the key says Jet Rock, bituminous mudstone. I can tell you the blocks were all hard and sharp edged, and a lighter grey compared to the alum shale. Some of the bits did indeed smell of oil when opened.

I understand there are specific names for some of the aptychi. Anyone knowledgable enough to name them?
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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TqB
Dean tracked down at least some of the Port Mulgrave aptychi to Howarth's bed 32 which is the Tiltoniceras rich layer right at the top of the Grey Shales, immediately below the Cannonball nodule bed (with Eleganticeras) that is the base of the Jet Rock.

I've also found some nice large ones quite a bit further up in the Jet Rock itself around Saltwick, in beds 43-45 (above the Youngibelus tubularis layer).



Edited by TqB 2014-05-26 16:39:55
Tarquin
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deltapodus
I see I still have a lot to learn: while I have a rough idea of what's what in terms of rocks, formations, and even subzones, I wouldn't be able to identify one bed from another...
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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janetsbears
deltapodus wrote:
I see I still have a lot to learn: while I have a rough idea of what's what in terms of rocks, formations, and even subzones, I wouldn't be able to identify one bed from another...

No doubt any partner would soon let you know if you were in the wrong bed!

Seriously though, where do you find out which bed it which? It's something I'd like to know in some areas I search in.

Chris
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Elbert
Hello, if you want information about wich bed is wich you can try to obtain"The Yetrock series and the Alum shale series of the Yorkshire coast" by M.K. Howarth, published bij the Yorkshire Geological Society, vol. 33, part 4, no 18, 19-12-1962
It is an older publication and some names have, these days,  been changed, but it is still my most usefull guide on the stratification of the Yorkshire upper lias.
Same author has written many a superb publication on the subject and must be, in my humble opinion, be regarded as England`s most little known great scientist...

It is well possible that you have collected most of your material (with the aptychi) from the boundary layer that separates Grey shale and Yetrock, since Tiltoniceras is the guidefossil of bed 32 and Eleganticeras is next in the sequence.

And: yes, it`s great to be in the right bed most of the time...

 

greetings, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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deltapodus
I've got a pdf of that - as a YGS member, I have access to such things - just never read it in full. 
I'll have to put that right. Definitely agree - Howarth seems  to be unfairly unknown.
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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janetsbears
deltapodus wrote:
I've got a pdf of that - as a YGS member, I have access to such things - just never read it in full. 
I'll have to put that right. Definitely agree - Howarth seems  to be unfairly unknown.

So, I could pay $30 to get the article or I could pay ƒâ€š‚£33 to get membership of the YGS and get free access to this and loads of other articles that may be of interest?

Chris
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deltapodus
As a member of the YGS, you get access to everything they've digitised. I could spend all day reading through the articles. Sadly, work has to happen.
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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janetsbears
I've just been scanning through the index pages and it's putting me off joining a bit - I don't think I've got time due to work, there's so much there I'd like to read!

Chris
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deltapodus
Elbert wrote:
are the last ones from the Yetrock or the bituminous shale? 

Just going back to this question. If it helps, one of the aptychus was in situ underfoot, in the area marked Jet Rock on the map. Would that be the bed 32 mentioned above?
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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TqB
It depends which part of the beach it's from - the maps in the Howarth paper show where the individual beds are.
Tarquin
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deltapodus
Ah, now there's a problem. As I recall it, the spot was within what I think of as the harbour itself - an area just marked as grey shale on the map. I walked over loose, sharp edged blocks, then turned left heading back towards the cliff, In effect, I was walking along a ridge before it dips down, with the dip on my right hand side. Does that help?
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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Elbert
Hello, if you got the block out of situ at the foot of the cliff, it may well be bed 32; could you see any (holes of) canonballs in that piece of situ?
Bed 32  measures, according to Howarth, 5 feet, so there is some space to play with...

 

And the obvious difference between Tiltoniceras and Eleganticeras is the edge of the umbilical ( center hole ) of the ammonite; Tiltoniceras has rounded edges in the middle and Eleganticeras sharp angeled ones...( thanks Andy)

 

greetings, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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deltapodus
Elbert, thanks for that on Tiltoniceras and Eleganticeras - will go and have another look at the fiinds tomorrow. Been in touch with Dean Lomax (thanks, Dean) who tells me that it was indeed bed 32. Just bought myself Howarth's The Stratigraphy and Ammonite Fauna of the Upper Liassic Grey Shales of the Yorkshire Coast. Reckon that might help me with beds and ammonites. Got some more pics to post later, but, for now, I'm very pleased with the way the multi block of Dactylioceras is prepping. 
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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deltapodus
A couple more bits. Forgot to photos the multi Dactylioceras to show how it's coming along.. Speaking of which, I think there's original shell in there. Must post a pic to see what you think. For now, a couple of other bits. 1st up, belemnite phragmocone, I think biggest I've ever seen, from Rosedale Wyke.
 PM1.JPG 
Id, please on this ammonite?

PM2.JPG 

Rereading what's been said in this thread, those aptychi were definitely bed 32. Although they were loose, they were very close to ones in situ (which I left): the preservation and surrounding sediment looked the same to me.
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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deltapodus
Finally got myself an airpen. Wish I'd bought one earlier.
Here's a quick update on the multi dac block earlier in this thread.
airpen_2.jpg 

From Saltwick, not Port Mulgrave, but the 1st one I've prepped without going through the inner whorls accidentally. 1st two I had a go at I did just that - at least they were dacs and nothing rare - I didn't realise just how powerful the airpen was at 1st. Don't think I'm a natural with an airpen, but I'm learning.

Finally found bone[biggrin]
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aurelius
What type/make of airpen did you get?
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Jason
deltapodus wrote:
 
I didn't realise just how powerful the airpen was at 1st. Don't think I'm a natural with an airpen, but I'm learning.

 
Somethig i find that helps  - Try turning the regulator down a touch on the compressor.... I find less BPM's equals less damage to the fossil if its in softer matrix.
 
If you're working on pyrite then turn it up a little.
 
and remember to go across the surface instead of down into the matrix and fossil!!
 
Patience is key... Good luck
 
Jason
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