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SLStephen
Whilst searching for ammonites at Runswick bay, we came across this, which might appear to be some manner of footprint. We're total amateurs. I have no idea about the origin (whether this is simply just some decades old hardened putty some child played with, or something of significant interest to the scientific community), am not sure about the material (but in similar looking "shale" rocks, we found a lot of ammonites and possible bivalves) but this was found on the beach, around the area where the high tide watermark was present. Any suggestions/advice would be gratefully received. Click image for larger version - Name: 20200521_110935.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 212.04 KB
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Barrow Museum
Footprints of Jurassic tetrapods are found along the Yorkshire coast, but these are always found in sediments that formed in terrestriaL environments such as river banks, interdistributory mudflats and the like. Such sediments form the bulk of the Middle Jurassic, capping the cliffs south of Whitby and made of well-bedded sandstone and interbedded mud deposits, with land plant fossils
Your Runswick Bay slab is clearly a chunk of the Whitby Mudstone Formation, which was laid down as soft mud on the floor of a deep sea.  This mud was subsequently intensely compressed during burial and is a fraction of its original thickness.  Any impression in the seafloor would be completely flat now. The occurrence of footprints in this rock is therefore impossible, I am sorry to pronounce.  What you have found is a coincidental erosive feature.
If on a future expedition, you are lucky enough to find a footprint, chances are that it will be the cast in sandstone.  The originally soft mud, into which the dinosaur trod, is easily washed away, leaving its impression as a positive mould, more or less mimicking the animal's foot.
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prep01
This looks like a cluster of bivalve/brachiopod shells under a thin layer of mudstone which you might be able to remove by gentle scaping, brushing with water.
Colin Huller
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SLStephen
Thank you very much for the replies, they're much appreciated. 
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Gary W
Doesnt look like prints to me go to Burniston Wyke to see them ( though NOT to collect any)
Gary
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