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fossil_bob
hi i have just read all of the posts and i was just wondering if they need de-salting before i varnish etc
many thanks

p.s does bees wax do anything for fossils?
marlene
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Bill

All fossils collected at coastal exposures should be soaked in distilled/de-ionised water for a week or so to remove salt. Change water daily.

A cheaper tip, which I have found causes no problems, is to put small fossils in the foot of a ladies stocking/tights and suspend in the toilet cistern. This refreshes the water with every flush. Gently brush the fossil with a soft toothbrush before leaving to dry. Some say the Calcium Carbonate in hard water areas will be absorbed by the fossil, or leave a coating but I have found no problems from this.

Fossils from the Chalk should be put in a container with a small amount of water so as not to soak the chalk to quickly. The chalk will absorb the water slowly this way. Once completely soaked the fossil can then be placed in plenty of water to remove the salt. If the fossil, ie a chalk filled echinoid, is simply "dumped" into a bucket of water the chalk will absorb the water too quickly and could destroy the fossil. 



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Bill


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Pete

To preserve the shell on folkestones original shelled ammos the best method is to first soak the ammo in fresh water for 24 hours. Then with a very soft hobby brush remove any remaining clay. Once the ammonite is thouroughly dry coat it using Sally Hansons hard as nails varnish, which can be thinned down with acetone if required. Once the ammo is fully coated and dry, using liquid parafin, soak the ammonite in the parafin for about 24 hours. After 24 hours remove ammo and dry using kitchen roll. The finished article one gault ammo with beautiful irridescent colours.

Pete g



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FOSSILS01


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MrPolly
Hi Pete, thanks for the advice. Is there any specific 'kind' of acetone one should use, for example I believe that normal chemist shops sell acetone for nail varnish removal and the like. Would this be suitable?
Thanks


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Pete

Hi MrPolly no the acetone you can buy in the high street cosmetics shop is fine.

Pete g



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FOSSILS01


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Keef

Diluted PVA is my passion, that way it leaves a super thin coat of PVA not thick & gloopy, which I agree is double duff !

Keef



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I'm gonna PVA the world !
Spiders are our friends !
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Fred

Try paraloid, the museums swear by it.

Fred



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Webmaster, http://www.sheppeyfossils.com, and http://www.gaultammonite.co.uk
http://www.mlms.org.uk


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Fossil Magnet

Not sure if this kind of product placement is allowed, but I use Bristows extra firm hold hairspray (and no, they don't pay me for saying it). Perhaps UKGE could start stocking it...?

It works exceptionally well on pyrite, but is also very good on phosphatic bones and chitino-phosphatic remains such as crabs, lobsters, insects, ect. I also use it on certain types of bivalves and brachiopods, but that's more for the sake of apparance than preservation. Shark's teeth, especially worn and scratched ones from the London Clay, also look much better. It brings out the shine of the enamel, reduces visible scratches, and doesn't spoil the look of the root.

It also brings out the finer surface details on, say, crabs from Folkestone, and what's more, if they are a little beach-tumbled, it reduces the appearance of external scratches considerably.

Ensure that your specimens are completely dry, place on a towel or non-fluffy piece of fabric outdoors, in the sun, and then spray very thinly and quickly over the surface from about 50cm+ distance. Always use outside, where ventilation is not a problem, and wear a protective mask just to be on the safe side.

Let each coat dry for a minimum of 2 minutes, and when spraying, ensure that you DON'T do it slowly and linger over the fossil - short sharp bursts is what you want, to ensure a fine coating - otherwise you will end up with a coating that is too thick, and in this case often turns white and opaque. If this happens, wash the specimen thoroughly in warm soapy water, let it dry, and then try again.

The spray itself is perfumed, and I don't much like that aspect of it, BUT, give it a week or two and the scent dissipates entirely from the specimen.

CAUTION: If you use this method and then wash your fossil you will lose some or all of the protection. You can 'dry' clean them, but just bear this in mind if you get them wet, as in the case of pyretic fossils, you might wish to dry them out and spray again afterwards.

I would wholeheartedly recommend this alternative to any PVA addicts out there, as if you don't like it, you can just wash it off and apply PVA afterwards...

Gethin

NOTE: Every single ammonite you guys have seen in my posts are preserved in this way, even the nacreous ones from the Gault..

 

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"We try not to use the word insane, we prefer the term mentally hilarious..."


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Fossil Magnet
Would Fred, Pete G, or someone else who uses Paraloid care to explain their methodology succinctly for others...? The more detailed the better, when one of you has time...

Please, and thank you!!      

Gethin



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"We try not to use the word insane, we prefer the term mentally hilarious..."


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Teatree

This is not my idea but one i use - whatever method of preservation i use i also put silica gel in with my pyrite fossil to keep the humidity down.

This can be found in small sachets in electrical good ect.

I'm lucky have access to 100g bags!

As i've said not my idea but a good one(thanks to the member who posted it )

John



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long time dead


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Fossil Magnet
Great stuff, John, and thanks to the forum member who originally told you. This is exactly the kind of stuff we need on here...

Gethin


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"We try not to use the word insane, we prefer the term mentally hilarious..."


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Chris

For those who do not have, or do not have access to desicant silica gel, then as a temporary measure, dry white rice acts near enought the same. To prevent tarnish or other moisture related problems inside boxes or cabinets,  a small tighlty packed pot of cotton wool soaked in meths will do the trick. There are comercial items available from axminster.co.uk and other tool websites, for these things made for tool boxes. But the meths and cotton wool work just as well. The fumes, apparently drive moisture from the containing box. But they would be flammable, so do not open your cabinet with a fag in your mouth. But if your cabinet will be predominantly closed, then this could be a great way of preventing erosion to your pyrite items.

 

Heres the link from axminster. Its caled tool guard here, but it comes under many names. It will protect any metallic items in the container. Brilliant and simple idea.

 

Edit by Glenda

sorry Chris b I had to delete your link as my computor classed it as a security risk. Although my PC has up-to- date antivirus softwear i have to protect other members who might not be so well protected.



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Digging up old posts and bumping them back to the front :P


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Bill

As so many  people recommend, or not, the use of PVA, I thought I would post this.

I have a partial Mammoth tooth that my son found, in 1993, on a foreshore in West Sussex. It was covered in algae and recent barnacles, etc. After cleaning, soaking in fresh water and then dilute PVA, the tooth is still in the same condition as it was then.

Extract from link below,

Emulsions also have a tendency to turn yellow with age and cross-linking, but these negatives characteristics aside, there is probably no better treatment for soft, wet bone. Brand names such as Rhoplex AC33, CM Bond M3, and Union Carbide's AYAF, are all good general purpose PVA emulsions. They are normally mixed with water in a ratio of 15 to 20 parts emulsion to 85 to 80 parts water. This mixture can be brushed on the bone, or the specimen can be immersed in the consolidant mixture. As mentioned earlier, Elmer's Glue, is a type of polyvinyl acetate emulsion, and could be used on wet specimens. Because proprietary (commercial) brands such as Elmer's generally keep their formulas secret, and even periodically change their formulas, museum conservators do not like to use these commercial PVA emulsions. However, Rhoplex, CM Bond M3 and Union Carbide AYAF PVA emulsions are specifically designed and sold for conservation purposes and should be used when possible.

See http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/vertpaleo/resources/prep.htm



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Bill


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Stuart
Most pound shops sell silica gell, usually as small space de-humidifier bags (for wardrobes and draws etc.).
    VERY cheap!


   StuartJ
fossils rock!


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dinogary
does any one ever use or have tried clear wood varnish?..i used it on a couple of pieces and it has lasted 10 years with it,mind you i used it on a piece of stigmaria ,and few bivalves,that were really hard anyway ???
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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bikerboyzx6r
Jumping in a bit late here but I use Artists Matt Varnish (Winsor & Newton) ƒâ€š‚£5.95 75ml. It really intensifies colours and is easily removed if required.
Cheers
Dan
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dinogary
thanks for the tip mate Thumbs Up
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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Julian123
I like the look of Sally Hansons 'Hard As Nails' nail varnish diluted with Acetone.
Julian

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bikerboyzx6r

Julian123 wrote:
I like the look of Sally Hansons 'Hard As Nails' nail varnish diluted with Acetone.


I will leave that one for Saturday nights 
Cheers
Dan
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dinogary
depends on colour lol
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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