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RogerS
I dug this out of my back garden in Bexhill about 25 years ago.  At the time web resources were scarce and the best I could do was "probably a Pterosaur".  The teeth look decidedly piscivore in form and I was aware that large fish eating Pterosaur fossils had been found in the area.  My grandson is now showing an Internet in fossils so I thought I'd have another look.  Having found this forum I thought I'd ask.

Actual location was De La Warr Road about 600m west of the well known fossil site at Galley Hill, but it might not be from that area.  The underlying geology is Wealden Clay and Gypsum not the hard sandstone of the fossil Matrix and the area was parkland in the 19th c. so it could be relocated from a quarry elsewhere, there were a number near by..

Forth photo shows the largest tooth, it is about 2cm long so it is is a Pterosaur it is a big one.

DSCF0286.jpg  DSCF0287.jpg  DSCF0288.jpg  DSCF0290.jpg
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Barrow Museum
Sadly not Pterosaur, but belemnite - observe the radiating calcite crystal structure on the broken end.  Your grandson will appreciate it nonetheless, I am sure.
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Brittle Star
I think there is a smaller tooth in the photos, I think they are fish though. Not sure which original post was referring to
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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RogerS
observe the radiating calcite crystal structure on the broken end.


Not sure what photo you are referring to.   There is no broken end visible in any of the photos, and the one broken end I do have shows no chrystaline structure.

This is from the Wealden beds so land and fresh water creatures - no belemnites.
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Dirty Pete
I'd have put money on those 'teeth' being the pointed ends of belemnite guards.

Pete.
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Rolo
Some clearer pics are needed, most useful would be a close up of the two tooth like objects below the large object in pic 1. Those two items do appear to show a broken belemnite structure. Pics are not sharp enough to be sure though.
Bear in mind that all sorts of stuff ends up everywhere, whilst the geology of the area is Wealden Hastings beds,,,,, rocks dug up in the garden could have come from anywhere
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Paleoworld-101
Agree with belemnites, sorry! 
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Weald on Bed
Really need to see a pic of the broken ends. One of the main distinguishing characteristics of pterosaur limb bones (as with most flying animals) are the relatively thin walls, which minimised weight but unfortunately also minimised chances of survival in the fossil record.
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RogerS
Nothing immediately obvious but the looking at the large object on the broken end under a magnifying glass does appear to show an outer band just over 1mm thick.  Pretty sure I can't take a picture though.  I'll give it a try when I have time to play properly.  If you look at the photo of the broken end shown it also shos sighs of thin walls.  The small "bone" fragment (top left in the first 2 photos) also looks, under the magnifying glass, to be a thin walled tube filled filled with matrix.

The teeth/belemnites are slightly curved by the way, equally not obvious fron the photo, I'll try and get a side view.
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Dirty Pete
Suggest you use some 10% HCl or equivalent acid. All things being equal, Belemnites (CaCO3) will fizz , bones (Calcium phosphate) wont.

Here's some broken belemnites to be going on with..
belemnite.jpg 

Pete.
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RogerS
Dirty Pete wrote:
Suggest you use some 10% HCl or equivalent acid. All things being equal, Belemnites (CaCO3) will fizz , bones (Calcium phosphate) wont.


No HCl to hand, tried limescale romover.  The fossils don't react at all  The rock fizzes away quite happily, so possibly "Hastings Granite" which is calcareous  fine sandstone.
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Rolo
Can I suggest you take this along to Bexhill Museum, they will be able to ID or put you on to someone who can. They do look like belemnites but it can be deceptive without the specimen in hand. Also if these are Pterosaur fragments as you suspect, the specimen will be of interest to specialists as Wealden Pterosaurs are rare, fragmentary and remain poorly understood.
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prep01
I agree with Alan (Rolo) this needs prepping and looking at 'in the hand'.
Colin Huller
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Gary W
I must admit they do look more like belemnite fragments.  I agree that Bexhill is Wealden but you say it came from a road so might not actually be from there.
Gary
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RogerS
After much reading etc ....

I've already tried both Bexhill and Hastings Museums not long after I found it.  Neither had a fossil expert.  Hastings send them away, Bexhill said they had someone who comes in occasionally but couldn't say when they would be likely to be around.

I didn't say it was found on a road it was in my vegetable plot - about 60m from the road.

After much experimenting I did get a photo of the broken end showing what I mean amount appearing to be thin walled.

DSCF0295 (2).jpg   The following at then other end, where the "bone" flairs out also appears to be thin walled, but looking at pictures of Belemnite guards I can see why it might be one of those.  Not sure what part of a Belemnite the thin walled structure on the right would be though
DSCF0298.jpg
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TqB
That is, with 100% certainty, a  belemnite. 🙂 (Although every one else here will agree, that is an expert opinion - I did a Ph.D on them!)
The flared out bit is indeed thin walled - it's the crushed alveolar part of the rostrum where the phragmocone has disintegrated or dissolved out.
The apparent wall on the broken bit is just a preservational feature of the concentric layers, probably with secondary calcite (i.e. from percolating solutions in the rock).
Tarquin
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estwing
I agree with Tarquin (who wouldn't? 😎)
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Dirty Pete
As I said I'd have put money on it but why didn't they fizz with acid? 

Here's one bubbling like mad in the shape of Africa with 10% HCl:
acidbelemnite.jpg 

Are silicified belemnites very common?

Pete.
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RogerS
The research I do the more I see Belemnites 😁

When I first found it I took it to the Museum and compared it to their collection of local fossils.  Pterosaur was the nearest, but I'd never been entirely convinced.  I'd never even considered belemintes because they aren't found locally.  Who knows where my rock came from.

I assume I've got a bit of demolition rubble from where they turned Earl De la Warr's park into a building site in 1908.  Fossil studded rocks in garden structures were very popular in the 17th and 18th c. as I'm sure you all know better than I do.

Pete - comparing the crystal structure of  my fossil with a chunk of silicified wood I would say the have silicified.
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prep01
This looks like a 'normallly' preserved belemnite to me with the section showing the radiating Calcite crystal pattern. Maybe your acid was not concentrated enough, especially if you didn't use 5 - 10% Hydrochloric acid. The bonds that form the crystals are slightly harder to break than other carbonates.
Chemistry lecture over!
As to why they were found there? With Man's ability to transport material, anything can turn up anywhere!!!! I believe this will become more of a problem in the future, especially to the amateur.
Colin Huller
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