GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
Rustang
Hi guys, so I visited King's Dyke for the first time today, I found some nice fossils, mostly Belemnites one of which is a beauty and appears to be a Pyrite Belemnite as its gold! Can someone help clarify this? It's confusing though as I believe there's nothing else that's pyrite at Kings Dyke but I did find another Belemnite with a couple of small spots of a golden color on it. Also, if anyone has any tips for removing the harden clay that would be awesome!? Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190720_190843_804.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 157.09 KB
Quote 0 0
TqB
I can't really see it in the photo (it's hard to photograph!) but some pyritisation is quite common in belemnites from some beds, including parts of the Oxford Clay. It usually affects just the outer surface of the rostrum, and is often found around the phragmocone.
Tarquin
Quote 0 0
Rustang
Thank you for the response, it appears to cover the entire outer layer of the Belemnite, it looks stunning under all the dirt and clay that's stuck on the out side which would be great to fully remove, has you got any tips for this?
Quote 0 0
Rustang
Thanks for the response, it appears to cover the entire outer layer of the Belemnite and looks stunning under all the dirt and clay that's stuck to the outside, it would be great to remove clay and dirt if anyone has any tips for this?
Quote 0 0
Rustang
TqB wrote:
I can't really see it in the photo (it's hard to photograph!) but some pyritisation is quite common in belemnites from some beds, including parts of the Oxford Clay. It usually affects just the outer surface of the rostrum, and is often found around the phragmocone.


Thanks for the response, it appears to cover the entire outer layer of the Belemnite and looks stunning under all the dirt and clay that's stuck to the outside, it would be great to remove clay and dirt if anyone has any tips for this?
Quote 0 0
prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. As Tarquin says, they can have bits of Pyrite on the surface. The specimen can be polished using course > fine grades of 'wet & dry' paper then a final polish. I am in the process of updating  an article I wrote for this forum all about it, but the original article no longer exists I'm afraid.
Colin Huller
Quote 0 0
Rustang
prep01 wrote:
Hello and welcome to the forum. As Tarquin says, they can have bits of Pyrite on the surface. The specimen can be polished using course > fine grades of 'wet & dry' paper then a final polish. I am in the process of updating  an article I wrote for this forum all about it, but the original article no longer exists I'm afraid.


This one has a whole outer coating of a gold colour and shimmer, I'm hoping to polish it but need help removing the clay first if you have any tips?
Quote 0 0
Anonymous
Thanks guys, its appears that the golden colour surrounds the whole outer surface, it looks stunning under the clay and muck which I need to remove, I'm hoping to then polish but if you have any tips on how to remove the clay from the outer surface that would be great?
Quote 0 0
TqB
I'm not a fan of polishing belemnites unless they're already worn. It destroys surface detail and much of the scientific value.

Removing the sticky layer on these is usually difficult - I think careful air abrading is the only practical way.
Equipment is expensive but a professional should be able to do it - still quite expensive as a good job would be time consuming.
If anyone knows another method, I'd love to hear it! 

Tarquin
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us