GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
aideym
I've recently joined this forum after very recently developing an interest in archaeology and geology ( something I used to do with my father 45 years ago. My main hobby is motorsport marshaling and I often find myself stood in fields on disused ww2 airfields. Here are some of the items I have found kicking the dirt about. The Ammonite and the Gryphaea were my first discoveries and started it all off as I'd never seen Gryphaea before. However I haven't been able to work out what the other item is. Pieces of crushed shell are apparent all over but I've looked through the books and not found anything similar. Has anyone any idea what it is?  Secondly is there a similar forum to this for identifying rocks? As I'm stumped by a few things.. Anyway thanks in advance. I'm about to start photographing my finds from around the coast
Aiden
20180905_174952.jpg  20180905_175022.jpg  20180905_175031.jpg  20180905_175034.jpg  20180905_175137.jpg  20180905_175145.jpg  20180905_175216.jpg 
Quote 0 0
Brittle Star
Hi, Broken shells and other detritus accumulating on the sea bed or reef do clump together under pressure, maybe you could break it open to see what is inside, that may show other things that have more detail and have not been eroded so much.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
Quote 0 0
aideym
Thank you for the reply. I hadn't thought of breaking it open. That sounds interesting. When I get my preparation tool kit I'll give it a go.

Aiden
Quote 0 0
prep01
Hello Aiden, I have enlarged your b;ock and I can see fragments of various fossils including what looks like a partial bivalve (Scallop type). Please could you say where each one was found as this would help a lot. Please could you add a scale to ALL photos / say what size the squares are on your graph paper?
Colin Huller
Quote 0 0
aideym
The scales are 5mm squares. Sorry they aren't present in all the photos I was experimenting with how to take the pictures at the time. So the gryphaea and the ammonia were found at RAF Fullback near Newark and the good last was found at Grafton Underwood near Kettering
Quote 0 0
prep01
Thanks for the info. There is a geology section on this site. I'm not sure where the block came from? The Graphaea look from your photo like G. arcuata, but your specimens are from the later Jurassic deposits so they may be what is known as 'derived' in other words not found in the area in which they were fossilised. The ammonite is Jurassic but again may be derived and there isn't enough of it to even say what ot is.
Colin Huller
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us