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Nic B
D3BEF332-2A10-406E-ACD9-CA71CE8F7953.jpeg  435FE153-3BA7-42A8-8583-C7899E0055B2.jpeg  C093145E-380B-49CD-89BA-BA03BEFEAD3B.jpeg 
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Weald on Bed
"We're gonna need a bigger pond..."

Hi Nic,

You don't mention whereabouts in the country you are. Somewhere in East Sussex/Kent by any chance (at first glance resembles rocks of the Ashdown Formation) ?Knowing the rough area is often key in identifcation. 
Is this local bedrock or something that was brought in? Either way, looks very promising. Keep digging!


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Nic B
Hi am in mid sussex near Lindfield , I had a large pond cleaned out the diggers got down to bed rock, and they broke out a load of large rocks for me some of which contain fossils either bone fragments or fish scales , I think garfish scales !!, I don't know much about the geology of the area but the pond would have been dug out to get to the rock in Tudor times as part of the iron industry.
           Am wondering what age the rib might be and what animal it might be from ???.
    
                                           Thanks.
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prep01
Welcome to the forum. Your profile says Sussexbut a little closer would help.
Colin Huller
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Nic B
Hi yep I live in Sussex , Burgess hill I found the fossil near Lindfield,  
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Weald on Bed
Well this makes sense. There are a number of historically important Wealden fossil locations around Burgess Hill (e.g. Keymer Brickworks), Cuckfield, Ardingly, etc. These are mostly associated with the so-called Wadhurst Clay Formation, which is what you get outcropping around Lindfield, interspersed with the Tunbridge Wells Sandstones (the fantastic Geological Map viewer at http://mapapps.bgs.ac.uk/geologyofbritain/home.html will help you pinpoint the rocks around your location). 

The Wadhurst Clays were laid down in the Early Cretaceous. So the original owner of your rib fossil lived ~135million years ago, in a vast, swampy, esturine or freshwater delta-like setting (imagine something a bit like the Okavango Delta is today but with rather different wildlife). Various dinosaur fossils have been found in those deposits, as well as large numbers of freshwater crocodiles, some of which were surprisingly small. 
As for which species your rib came from... Haven't a clue I'm afraid!  Unfortunately ribs are not terribly diagnostic - most reptiles have ribs that look pretty similar - though someone more expert than I may be able to say whether it's from a small dinosaur or a croc.  Either way, it's a delightful  little specimen.

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