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Dollydebs
Hi, recently visited the Yorkshire Coast for the first time and going through our misc finds now.  
This although not a fossil is interesting and we would be interested to know what it is; seems softer than the shale rocks there and how it was formed should anyone know.
Quite heavy for its size, 625gms and although very hard (not crumbly) can be scratched as one of the photos depicts.
Have taken photos both wet and dry, colouration varies from a grey clay to white and the piece has a flat base with a couple of smaller flat arms, almost like it wedged between two flat areas during formation?
My thanks in advance for your time and any pointers you can provide Click image for larger version - Name: DSCF8803.jpg, Views: 53, Size: 321.85 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSCF8805.jpg, Views: 61, Size: 282.03 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSCF8812.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 452.88 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSCF8820.jpg, Views: 51, Size: 263.43 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSCF8822.jpg, Views: 47, Size: 371.91 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSCF8823.jpg, Views: 46, Size: 342.10 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSCF8803.jpg, Views: 37, Size: 321.85 KB
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Weald on Bed
Those pits and pock-marks look like recent bio-erosion, probably the tube worm, Polydora ciliata. 
Piddock holes are larger while those formed by boring-sponges are normally small but rounder.
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Dollydebs
Thank you so much, I shall look into this now.
Would you say the matrix is the Grey Shale Member? Was found loose and on its own and do not want to assume a thing and the white edging threw me.
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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. I am not an expert in geology, but to me this looks to be 'man made' rather than formrmed naturally if you get my drift! I would say industrial slag of some sort.
Colin Huller
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TqB
I agree with Weald on Bed, this is formed by modern Polydora borings. It seems to be a local limestone nodule, Grey Shale or higher.
Tarquin
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Dollydebs
We thought so at too first especially with that large flat base and overall shape but after closer inspection under our magnifying lamp it looked more organic in origin and I wondered if the flat protrusions formed possibly by being wedged against larger flatter rocks? There are a couple of smaller arms with flat edges. Some small disc like pebbles were slotted in the holes, of the same matrix which were dislodged during cleaning.  We know nothing about geology hence my post and question.
An interesting piece as not obvious to what it is and has kept me busy on the research sites.
Will let my husband know Colin, along with the caveat that this is the only type he is allowed to pick up on our travels! I am now reading up on the Piddock, something I had never heard of til today.
Huge thanks everyone for all your guidance, has been invaluable,  Debs
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prep01
Hi Debs, it is always difficult when it's 'not in the hand'!  For confirmation I waould take it to a museum for them to look at. Keep picking stuff up and good luck.
Colin Huller
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Elbert
Hello, this is most likely a Grey shale nodule wich once contained the phragmocone of a belemnite; on the third photo you can see the remnant of it sticking out of the nodule on the right/lower side of the nodule.
Alas the fossil has been almost completely consumed by stone eating organisms...wich is what happens if we do not rescue them in time...

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Dollydebs
Thank you, shall be looking further under magnification later today out of curiosity before it goes on the Misc. shelf.  The site itself is a tadge tricky to access so this was the only 'of interest' find as weight was an issue going back up so concentrated on the more obvious. 

Again my thanks to everyone for your time, Debs
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