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simon pitts
This is some 2ft across, it's hard like flint, on the shore line Gorleston-On-Sea. I don't have a clue what it is, was hoping someone here would?P1090051.jpg 
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Richard
I think it is a very weathered septarian nodule. 
Richard
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Barrow Museum
Richard is quite right.  If you are interested in more explanation, your septarian nodule formed when a patch of lime concentrated around something in a mudstone sediment (often a shell) a short distance below the seafloor, during the time of deposition of the sediment. These concretions shrank internally as they hardened and small cracks formed in their interior. These then filled with mineral, which in your case looks like calcite (lime). You have a complete example of one of these concretions. Because of the way they formed, it is not unusual for a decent, uncompressed fossil to be found inside them. though it may have a "crazy paving" appearance due to the changes that occurred in the concretion as it became more indurated.  Yours reminds me of many I have seen in the Upper Jurassic clays of the Midlands.  As there is no Jurassic clay exposed anywhere near Gorleston, yours must have been transported by glacier during the ice age, having been scraped up from the floor of the North Sea or Lincolnshire, some way to the north.
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simon pitts
Wow thank you for getting back and in so much detail.
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