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Bobo the bear
Great day and lots of fossils for my Grandson to pick up most of them pyritised.
First 3 pix are of multi slate with I counted 5 ammonites and many bivalves?
Last 2 pix are bivalve? Cannot see ridge lines clearly unless you wet the specimen and looks symmetrical like a small clam

SAM_1984.jpg  SAM_1985.jpg  SAM_1986.jpg  SAM_1988.jpg  SAM_1989.jpg 

Bobothebear
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TqB
Last two are of a worn Carboniferous solitary coral (horn coral), possibly Palaeosmilia but hard to tell for sure without more of it.
Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
TqB wrote:
Last two are of a worn Carboniferous solitary coral (horn coral), possibly Palaeosmilia but hard to tell for sure without more of it.


Thanks for that but what on earth is a carboniferous coral doing at Runswick...all the rocks there I thought were Jurassic around 190 my old
Bobothebear
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prep01
Glacia; from further North!
Colin Huller
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TqB
As Colin says, it's a glacial erratic. Carboniferous erratics are common all down the east coast - I've collected many species of coral. [smile]
Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
Guess the ammo's are  Tiltoniceras antiquum and bivalves are Pseudomytiloides dubius
Bobothebear
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Bobo the bear
TqB wrote:
As Colin says, it's a glacial erratic. Carboniferous erratics are common all down the east coast - I've collected many species of coral. [smile]


OK Like the Halysites coral I picked up at Filey which you ID'd but that was mush older.
Bobothebear
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TqB
Bobo the bear wrote:


OK Like the Halysites coral I picked up at Filey which you ID'd but that was mush older.


I just checked back and yours wasn't a Halysites (which has been found a couple of times). It's an equally weird erratic for the area though - if Silurian, it would be a Favosites.

The ammonites aren't Tiltoniceras but Dactylioceras,  D. semicelatum if they're from the upper Grey Shales. The bivalves will be "Posidonia" radiata


Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
TqB wrote:


I just checked back and yours wasn't a Halysites (which has been found a couple of times). It's an equally weird erratic for the area though - if Silurian, it would be a Favosites.

The ammonites aren't Tiltoniceras but Dactylioceras,  D. semicelatum if they're from the upper Grey Shales. The bivalves will be "Posidonia" radiata



Fantastic...thanks for your help Tarquin...I am cataloguing my collection so it will iron out some errors I've made
Bobothebear
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Bobo the bear
prep01 wrote:
Glacia; from further North!


Hi Colin. Grandson found this Belemnite also at Runswick Bay....largest I've seen in real life but I couldn't ID it for him. Any chance you've come across this beast before.


large belemnite.jpg 




Bobothebear
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prep01
I'll leave the belemnite to Tarquin as he's an expert on North Yorkshire ones!
Colin Huller
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Bobo the bear
TqB wrote:
As Colin says, it's a glacial erratic. Carboniferous erratics are common all down the east coast - I've collected many species of coral. [smile]


Hi Tarquin. Colin said you are the expert on N Yorks Belemnites.
Any chance of ID for one I posted on here for my Grandson. He picked it up at Runswick last week along with the other stuff in this topic.

THX
Bob
Bobothebear
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TqB
Hi Bob,

That's an interesting one and rather rare if I'm reading the size right - over 3cm diameter and about 16cm long?

It would help a lot if you knew what beds it came from - I suspect it's from the Jet Rock or just above, well exposed to the north of the village.

If so, it's probably a form included in Acrocoelites trisulculosus in Howarth's Toarcian belemnite monograph. This is a large species anyway (up to 20cm or more) and is the main one in those beds but isn't usually so thick. There may be a case for it being a distinct species if there aren't any intermediates - more work needed!

Here's my only similar one (a gift from a generous friend!) - a similar specimen now in Whitby Museum was named Belemnites validus by Simpson in the 1850s so validus is an available specific name if one is needed.

Acrocoelites trisulculosus, cf. validus (Simpson)
IMG_2854.jpg 


A typical largeish A. trisulculosus (upside down!):
IMG_1490.jpg 
 

Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
Base diameter is 3.5 cm and length is 13 cm but the point is obviously missing and also I suspect some of the base.
It was indeed found loose on  top of slate beds at Northern end of Runswick Bay about 50 meters from the fallen sandstone before the promontory towards Port Mulgrave. There were more large Belemnites actually fixed in the slate but none the size of this one
When he first showed it to me I thought it was plant because of its blackened appearance that is until I held it and looked closer
I'll call it a Acrocoelites trisulculosus for now anyway

Many thanks for your information my grandson will be overjoyed to find something rare and he'll be able to show off at his next bring and tell at school
Bobothebear
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TqB
Thanks, that all fits then and I'm pleased to have seen it - I wonder if someone had left it there as they don't usually just fall out like that!

(By the way, it's all shale on this side of the country, not slate - slate is when it's been metamorphosed, as in Wales and the Lake District 😉 )
Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
TqB wrote:
Thanks, that all fits then and I'm pleased to have seen it - I wonder if someone had left it there as they don't usually just fall out like that!

(By the way, it's all shale on this side of the country, not slate - slate is when it's been metamorphosed, as in Wales and the Lake District 😉 )


Sorry Tarquin, been collecting from Redcar down to Filey for 56 years (my Uncle lived at Easington near Loftus) and its always been Slate to me...blame my Father I guess..lol

By the way...is there any point in visiting Skinningrove these days...not been since workings and dumping were abandoned
Bobothebear
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TqB
Yes, locals have probably always called it slate - I guess it's pesky later geologists who redefined it.[rolleyes]

Skinningrove is similar to Saltburn - a lot of Staithes Sandstone Formation - so trace fossils, bivalves, belemnites with the odd ammonite and echinoderm if you're lucky.
Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
TqB wrote:
Yes, locals have probably always called it slate - I guess it's pesky later geologists who redefined it.[rolleyes]

Skinningrove is similar to Saltburn - a lot of Staithes Sandstone Formation - so trace fossils, bivalves, belemnites with the odd ammonite and echinoderm if you're lucky.


THX TQB
Here are some more photos of the belemnite. Never seen the growth rings before at the Base.
I suppose all Belemnites are the same but they show pretty well on this one.


bb1.jpg  bb2.jpg  bb3.jpg 
Bobothebear
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TqB
Thanks for those, very helpful and it's good to see the end of the phragmocone. It would have been a whopper!
The Acrocoelites from there do show very clear growth lines - in fact, the preservation is generally excellent and sometimes may even involve some soft tissue preserved as pyrite on the surface. This is presumably down to the anoxic sea floor conditions at the time.

Here's a phragmocone with protoconch from there, and growth lines. 
IMG_1368.jpg 
Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
TqB wrote:
Thanks for those, very helpful and it's good to see the end of the phragmocone. It would have been a whopper!
The Acrocoelites from there do show very clear growth lines - in fact, the preservation is generally excellent and sometimes may even involve some soft tissue preserved as pyrite on the surface. This is presumably down to the anoxic sea floor conditions at the time.

Here's a phragmocone with protoconch from there, and growth lines. 
IMG_1368.jpg 



Excellent. Speaking of Phragmocones...found this one at Saltwick. I was told they were common but again I've never seen one as big and in such good condition as this even on-line (they all appear squashed).  It is just over 8 cm long by 3 cm wide at base  but there is more still in the nodule.  Could it be from Acrocoelites.



SAM_1957.jpg 
Bobothebear
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TqB
That's a very nice one! From Saltwick it is indeed most likely, but not definitely, to be from an Acrocoelites.

More common are the Passaloteuthis bisulcata from the Grey Shales  lower down the sequence (below the Jet Rock). Although also occurring in nodules, they're usually at least partly crushed as you say.
We're lucky around here, belemnite phragmocones preserved beyond the rostrum are generally rare.

Another possibility is a small Megateuthis from higher up the Alum Shales, like this one (the rostrum is complete, the squashed bit at the end is an epirostrum).
(Actually, whether this one should be called Megateuthis, Acrocoelites or something else is debateable.)

IMG_2465.jpg
Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
Thx Tarquin, that explains a lot.
Bobothebear
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TqB
Bobo the bear wrote:


OK Like the Halysites coral I picked up at Filey which you ID'd but that was mush older.


I've just twigged that a likely source of erratic Silurian corals on the Yorkshire coast is Norway, maybe the Oslo district where they're well known. Igneous erratics from the area are quite common.

(As I said above, yours was actually a Favosites; Halysites (and/or Acanthohalysites) was found by Roy.
About a third of the way down this page, post #17).
Tarquin
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Bobo the bear
TqB wrote:
Yes, locals have probably always called it slate - I guess it's pesky later geologists who redefined it.[rolleyes]

Skinningrove is similar to Saltburn - a lot of Staithes Sandstone Formation - so trace fossils, bivalves, belemnites with the odd ammonite and echinoderm if you're lucky.


Hi Tarquin,
got a couple more big Belemnites for you from Runswick but this time they were from the South part towards Kettleness.
Any ID would be appreciated. The larger one appears to have a kind of Waist or narrowing part of the way down. I've only seen that on Hibolites types.

IMG_20180815_182932875.jpg  IMG_20180815_182955500.jpg
Bobothebear
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TqB
Hi, 

The larger one looks like a Passaloteuthis bisulcata from the Grey Shales. As you noticed, it's often a bit clavate (club shaped, widest towards the apex).
If it's from the same bed, the smaller one will be the same species.
(There is some Jet Rock that way too, with large Acrocoelites trisulculosus, but it's a lot harder and more difficult to extract from.)
Tarquin
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