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prep01
No I haven't

Colin Huller
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ryanc
Found this out dog walking - its an Iron rich sandstone chunk from the cretaceous Woburn Sands formation. It formed mostly in lagoon conditions. 


 

It has these odd scrape marks on the top surface - some sort of trace fossil? Each scrape contains tiny paralel lines.

 

Theres also what looks like a tiny footprint of something with two toes (top left) - shame the chunks not a bit bigger as a few more would be nice. The front of the print sinks slightly underneath the sand.

 

What do you think?

 

Regards,

 

Ryan

 

sand_print.jpg 
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Naze Dave
Could they be the imprints left by fossil plant material that has since been eroded away?
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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rab7ies
they look kind of leaf like?
down amongst the stones.
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ryanc
Naze Dave wrote:
Could they be the imprints left by fossil plant material that has since been eroded away?
Thanks

Dave


 

Its a possible - on the other hand theres a buildup of sediment at the end of a scrape like you'd get if you drag your finger through sand that suggests linear motion?

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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Naze Dave
Are the scrape marks flat or concave? If they were scrapes I'd expect them to be concave.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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Phileas fossilis
Looks like there were once wood fragments in there. Possibly partially burnt wood fragments. Burnt wood tends to form in rectangular fragments. Perhaps they were set alight by volcanic eruptions that happened around then which would be interesting. Have you found any reworked (derived) ammonites there? http://www.bedfordmuseum.org/collections/geology/woburn.htm has images of some. I dont think the footprint is one but I wouldnt be surprised if there were some around there. Two toes on these footprints in this thread I am working on http://www.discussfossils.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=2667&title=mammilatum-bed-and-gault-clay-finds similar fossil woord fragments are found in these layers also
Keep an eye out for similar! also for bones! if you find a trackway-take pictures. I'm not sure how deep the water would have been but may be a similar environment.

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ryanc
Flat though at an angle to the surface - I think your right with plant remains.
 

I looked at the scrapes under the microscope and there looks to be black carbon mixed amongst the quartz sand grains which I think is pretty much all you get for plant remains in sandstone - its not exactly a lagerstatten Big smile

 

Thanks for your help,

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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They look like fragments of horsetails.....Equisetites?...
Alan
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ryanc
Phileas fossilis wrote:
Have you found any reworked (derived) ammonites there? http://www.bedfordmuseum.org/collections/geology/woburn.htm has images of some. I dont think the footprint is one but I wouldnt be surprised if there were some around there.



 

There is a nodule layer in the formation but it's further to the west. 

 

The section I walk the dog by is more of geological interest than fossil interest though - some layers are bioturbated with preserved burrows and I have found occasional wood fragments but the cross stratification is more impressive.

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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spider
Ryan, Very interesting but I have no idea what it is. It sounds like your getting to grips with geology and getting right into the ' fossil zone '  Big smile
Have a nice day :0)
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TqB
I'll add my vote for wood/stems - there are similar pieces in shallow water Lias sandstones.
Tarquin
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prep01
*******This Post Has Been Hijacked*******
Sorry Ryan, but as these are also from the same beds - iron rich sandstone, Woburn sands, Leighton Buzzard area, I thought I would add this fella to the mix of unidentified possible fossils!

unknown_1.jpg 

unmown_2.jpg 



Colin Huller
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ryanc
I have seen those - I tagged them as simple iron concretions but the iron could actually be forming because of the presence of organic material on the inside of a burrow.



 

I have also found rounded nodules of the sandstone that contain smaller 'balls' of iron rich sandstone surrounded by loose sand - lots of oddities in that sandstone.

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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ryanc
Few more bits from the iron rich sands: first a piece of wood I think.sandwood.JPG 
 

Next - burrows - seem to be interconnecting.

tubeworm_or_burrow.JPG 

Tubeworm or burrow - taper towards a pointed end.

 

sandburrow.JPG 
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prep01
Where are yours from Ryan? I have had various thoughts on mine, but none of them concur - do you have any literature?



Colin Huller
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ryanc
Mine are all from central bedfordshire - a place called Rowney Warren near chicksands.
 

Its a great place to walk the dog in wet weather as the sand means most of it drains almost instantly so you dont get very muddy.

 

It has a series of ridges criss-crossed by paths and the human erosion of the pathways provides fresh blocks.

 

The layers of sandstone close to the surface have mostly been fractured into small blocks - presumably from the weight of glaciers?

 

I have attempted to work out how the sequence exposed at this site fits into the overall Woburn Sands formation but had to put that on hold while revising.

 

Now thats finished I will have a dig around when I get back from my holiday.

 

Have you ever visited the exposure at the RSPB reserve at Sandy?

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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