GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
aurelius
I'm not convinced it's a trago, since they always seem to have smooth keels, and mine has the sort of slightly undulating keel that I'd associate with an amaltheus - although I'm certainly not an expert.

The lipo isn't crushed on the right - you can't see on the photo, but the edge is poking out on the right-hand side of the block and is completely uncrushed. The left-hand side is another matter though, and I won't know if that's uncrushed until I'm able to prep it. I have high hopes though!
Quote 0 0
aurelius
Hi everyone,

Just back from a long day at Seatown. Fossil hunting conditions were difficult, we didn't find anything for two hours but eventually turned up a few bits.

Firstly, this massive rock that I had to carry around for four hours...

20140419_180528.jpg 

I spotted what appears to be the edge of an amaltheus protruding from the top. Only a centimetre at first, but I popped a bit more out and it looks like a reasonably sized ammonite (not as big as Parkinsonia's recent huge one though!).

20140419_180534.jpg 

I was a bit puzzled because I'm used to seeing amaltheus ammonites on the orange/brown coloured Eype clay blocks, but this doesn't resemble those. Is it really an amaltheus, and if it is, is there a reasonable chance of it being complete and prepping out well? I don't know much about these ammonites, I'm more familiar with the ones lower down the cliff! Any comments would be appreciated.

The day was made for me 30 minutes later, when I found this lying on the ground. Liparoceras are our favourite ammonites, and this one is absolutely gorgeous, and appears to be complete (it still has matrix on the lower part, so I have to keep my fingers crossed about the centre).

20140419_180446.jpg 
Quote 0 0
adam.morris08
That second one looks very promising! Would be interested to see how it cleans and preps up :)
Quote 0 0
Parkinsonia

That certainly looks like an Amaltheus peeping out of the top nodule and buried that deep, it looks promising that it could be whole. That's a lovely chunk of Liparoceras too, however, sorry to be a wet blanket, but despite appearances that may be all there is. Numerous times I've cheerfully lugged a great promising lump like that home only to find there's no more to it.......but then again, not always, and it's that 'not always' that makes it worth while. Nice find whatever!

Parkinsonia

Quote 0 0
aurelius
Thanks, I'm hoping they both turn out well. I have a good feeling about the liparoceras, because on the right, where the nodule has taken a big knock, you can see (although not in the photo) the edge of the ammonite curling out and then back round into the rock. So at least it's not just the body chamber that's survived.

We won't know for sure until we get our workshop built in a month or so!
Quote 0 0
Parkinsonia


That does sound like it's complete then! Nothing nicer than getting a complete specimen that's not water worn!


Quote 0 0
adam.morris08
Any progress with these?
Quote 0 0
aurelius
Sadly not, we've only just moved into our new house, and haven't yet converted our garage into the fossil workshop that it will soon become. We need to do some significant work on the garage to make it suitable, but we can't wait to get started.
Quote 0 0
Karsten
The first one seems to be a Tragophyloceras sp. The Lipo seems to be crushed on the right side...

Best greetings from Germany, Karsten
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us