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samwood120
I’m looking to go to Bracklesham Bay soon and was looking for tips on finding shark teeth, any help would be appreciated and of course any tips from your previous trips would be helpful, thanks :)
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Unregistered
I'm a newbie, but common tips might be to
1: look between the shoreline and the moss or rocks that get strangled on ground,waves can bring fossils over from other locations
2: much better tip, if there are any cliffs try bringing a rock hammer and pulling out sections of rock to look at, if no fossil in the pulled out rock or inner rock move to another location and repeat. if you don't have a hammer, try looking at cliffs with chunks of rock peeling off. it'll help reveal fossils in either one of the fallen off rocks or inner rocks.
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snowyandtintin
Hi samwood20
Bracklesham Bay can be very hit or miss. It's a nice family site, with good parking, nearby toilets and shops , with a pleasant, flat sandy beach but to get the best out of the locality, you really do need a good low Spring tide. Low, retreating tides expose the fossil shell beds and finds can be plentiful and spectacular. The mid-Eocene clays reveal a vast number of gastropods, shark teeth, bivalves, ray teeth, foraminifera, coral and turtle and fish remains but you can often get there, even in rough weather to find the beach sand has covered everything! Even when covered in sand, the large bivalve, Venericor planicosta, the spiralled gastropod Turritella and the foraminifera Nummelites is commonly found laying on the surface. Towards the car park, the shingle bank can produce occasional shark teeth but it's all a matter of timing, luck and weather/ tidal conditions. 
Your basic equipment will be a sharp pair of eyes and a bag to put your finds into. No hammers or other equipment are required.
Good luck!
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Brittle Star
Sorry but suggesting to anyone that it is a good idea to take a hammer to any cliffs is ridiculous. Not only is it destructive and a contribution to erosion but dangerous and it is totally against the fossil collecting code. A lot of places it is prohibited.

If you are new please do your research.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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MicroFossilMan
Brittle Star wrote:
Not only is it destructive and a contribution to erosion but dangerous and it is totally against the fossil collecting code.


Hear-hear.
MFM
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Elbert
Hello, @ JW: I bring a hammer to the beach (N-Yorkshire) to be able to break nodules and/or break/trim fallen bits of rock.
Surely that is not a problem?

greetings, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Brittle Star
Absolutely no problem Bert. Common sense should tell you to stay away from cliffs. Mary Anning was lucky to not get killed unfortunately her dog was not so lucky.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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