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maryb
Thanks all. Have been to a geological meeting tonight and you are right they appear to be modern bones. Hey ho. We still have a beautiful fish vertebra and a nipa fruit, as well as lots of other pyritised seeds, nuts and gastropods to show for our 2 visits.
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maryb
Will try and download photos of finds from Warden Point Sheppey for help to identify the bones. Thanks for any info.DSC_0143.JPG DSC_0144.JPG DSC_0148.JPG DSC_0151.JPG 
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ThomasM
They look like modern bones to me, sorry.
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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maryb
Hi. Yes I did wonder, but they were both deep in the clay and so feel they could well be of paleozoic origin, rather than modern day bovine.
Had a couple of medical students view them, who happened to be on the beach at the time and they couldn't identify them, but perhaps only first years!
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maryb
Other half's just walked in and says they are quite heavy and not dissimilar to the Aurok bone we found in the Essex clay.Anyone else got any ideas
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rab7ies
hi,i could well be wrong but i would plump for auroch too.
down amongst the stones.
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ThomasM
Paleozoic is much too old, 540 to 250 mya whereas Sheppey is Eocene (around 50mya). Rarely Pleistocene (maybe this is what you meant?) bones are found at Sheppey but the likelyhood is that they are only a few hundred to perhaps a thousand years old, modern bones always turn up on beaches and I believe Fred Clouter has found a human skull on Sheppey. These bones you have here do not appear to be fossilized.
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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rab7ies

dont know about what can be found there but pleistocene bones ive dug from cliff clay dont really look fossilised and if they were dug from clay are they modern?(altho i suppose it depends what you class as modern lol) p.s not that i know much about it anyway!

down amongst the stones.
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Fred
These are modern butchered bones. They are no older than the 19th Century. The waste from slaughtered horses and cows were dumped over the cliff and commonly turn up in the slumped clay. The most commonly found remains are horse teeth and butchered bones like these. There are river gravel deposits washing out at beach level between Hens Brook and Barrows Brook but to my knowledge no animal remains have been found washing out of them. They are not associated with the Thames river Gravels which have yeilded lots of Ice age mamal remains.
Fred
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rab7ies
i knew i should have kept out of it! hahaha
down amongst the stones.
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